Joseph U. Kawainui announces intent to publish a new paper run by Hawaiians, 1877.

BRAND NEW NEWSPAPER!

Pride of the Hawaiians.

As a result of the great desire of the people that a new Hawaiian newspaper be published under the management of a Hawaiian, therefore, I agree, and the Issue I of that new paper will be printed on Thursday, the 3rd of January, 1878, and thereafter, every Saturday.

It will be as large as the “Kuokoa,” and the cost for the year will be Two Dollars up front, or One Dollar for Six Months paid in advance.

I will exert myself along with skilled Hawaiians to make this new newspaper a newspaper that Hawaiians can be educated in the pressing issues of the day, Continue reading

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Hilo train, 1879.

Riding Steam Engine Train in Hilo.

Star Mill, Waiakea, Hilo, H.,
July 11, 1879, 1½ P. M.

Hon. Joseph U. Kawainui,

Aloha oe,—

Here I am now aboard the standing Locomotive, and I am writing what I see. Everything is going according to plans. The Locomotive is running with a single freight car attached, to test it out, for 840 feet in distance, and the tracks are still being laid.

Should you want to ride first on the train, come quickly. With delight,

Joseph Nawahi.

P. S. The steampower is 100 lbs, and its speed is between 18 and 20 miles per hour. J. N. Continue reading

In anticipation of King Kalakaua’s return from his tour around the world, 1881.

HONORING THE ALII, KING KALAKAUA.

All of the Associations, the Secret Societies, on this island of Oahu, and the other islands, people of all ethnicities, who want to join in giving glory by putting up arches and other public displays from the wharf of Ainahou until the Palace grounds, are ordered to appear before H. A. P. Carter, the Chairman of the Welcoming Committee and the Exaltation Committee. The Associations, the Secret Societies, and those who want to join in the parade of the day, notify CAPT. TRIPP or

J. U. Kawainui,

The Marshals of the Day.

[In “Hawaii’s Story,” Liliuokalani looks back to the day of her brother’s return:

“…With that enthusiasm always shown by the Hawaiian people in doing honor to their sovereigns, the grandest preparations were made throughout the islands to welcome the arrival of the king. In Honolulu the joy was general, and the foreign element was well represented in the festivities. The streets were given up to the people, and and were crowned with triumphal arches. Before the day of his expected landing at the wharf, the most elaborate preparations had been made to give him a royal greeting. The mottoes, in the selection of which numberless parties had consulted me, were displayed in every part of the city, and there was an especial arch designed for each district of the island of Oahu.]

(Ko Hawaii Pae Aina, 10/8/1881, p. 2)

KA HOOHANOHANO I KE ALII KA MOI KALAKAUA.

Ko Hawaii Pae Aina, Buke IV, Helu 41, Aoao 2. Okatoba 8, 1881.