Henry Berger’s 50th birthday, and commentary on eating stones, 1894.

Celebrating Fifty Years

This past Saturday, at 7:30, a joint concert was held with the Hawaiian Republic band and the band of the Philadelphia, on the grounds of the Hawaiian Hotel to commemorate the birthday of the bandmaster of the Government, who is 50 years old. That night was the 4664th time he gave concerts in various locations, and this is his 500th at that place. The Government band went first, and when they were through, then there were singers of haole songs chosen from a non-Hawaiian singing group from the uplands of Leiolono, and then came the boys of the sea [from the Philadelphia]. When that was over, the two groups joined together for the ending, and that was the conclusion of the activities of the night. The band stage was illuminated by electric lights and all sorts of Japanese lanterns under tree branches. Continue reading

On eating stones, 1894.

[Found under: “KELA A ME KEIA.”]

Because of the music of the boys of the Hawaiian band is constantly being of much acclaim, so to them went the jobs of entertaining parties of the haole of ours this past week. The P. G. band was not called for. They live, and do not have to eat stones. The visitors at the Hawaiian Hotel are those who want them the most.

[It was said that when the members of the Royal Hawaiian Band refused to sign an oath of allegiance to the P. G. The bandmaster Henry Berger told them they would end up eating stones… I cannot find a quote from the time. Does anyone know of one?]

(Makaainana, 10/15/1894, p. 8)

Mamuli o ke ohohia...

Ka Makaainana, Buke II—Ano Hou, Helu 16, Aoao 8. Okatoba 15, 1894.

Royal Hawaiian Band and “Kaulana na Pua,” 1893.

NIGHT OF GREAT ENTERTAINMENT.¹

There were many people who arrived at the Night of Entertainment by the Royal Hawaiian Band [Bana Lahui Hawaii], at the Hawaiian Hotel on the evening of this past Tuesday. There were perhaps 5,000 people of all ethnicities who showed up to listen to those beautiful singers of Hawaii. Because of your fine work, O Patriots, therefore the lahui showed its appreciation to you all, with them always filling the audiences of all the performances you give. The singing voices were sweet, and the most acclaimed was your “Mele Ai Pohaku.” The audience went home with happy hearts because of the mele that were played, along with the singing. When will the next performance be? Send in a notice in advance, and we will inform the multitudes and the friends of the occasion.

¹”Ka Po Lea o Halalii.”

(Leo o ka Lahui, 10/12/1893, p. 2)

KA PO LEA O HALALII.

Ka Leo o ka Lahui, Buke II, Helu 789, Aoao 3. Okatoba 12, 1893.

Hōkūleʻa, 1980 / 2015.

HOKULEʻA RETURNS

by Wayne Washburn

Greeted by a blessing of light showers, flowers, music, dance and many hugs and kisses, the crew members of the Hokuleʻa returned from Tahiti at 1:00 p.m. on June 6.

After 25 days at sea the crew slowly made its way through the crowd to a stage at Magic Island where the Royal Hawaiian Band, Leinaala Heine Kalama’s hula halau, and a musical group with the same name as the double-hulled canoe. Hokuleʻa, performed as part of the welcoming ceremony.

Each voyager was greeted by Gov. Ariyoshi and presented with a wooden bowl. In reference to the voyage Ariyoshi stated “…It once again demonstrates that in Hawaii the skills and the courage and the ability of the old Hawaiian is not lost, but remains with the modern native sons and daughters of Hawaii.”

Nainoa Thompson, the navigator, became the first Hawaiian to navigate by using the stars and currents in at least 200 years. The preciseness of his course has been heralded by many as a modern navigational triumph. Mayor Fasi said the voyage illustrated that: “The people of Hawaiian ancestry in Hawaii…can show the determination to get any job done that they set their hearts on.

This marked the second successful completion of a round trip voyage to Tahiti. The first voyage to Tahiti in 1976 was navigated by Mau Piailug, a celestial navigator from Satawal in Micronesia. The return trip to Hawaii was completed using modern navigational equipment and methods. A 1978 attempt to reach Tahiti ended in tragedy when Hokuleʻa swamped in the Molokai Channel. Crew member Eddie Aikau was lost in an attempt to reach help. The present trip was the first to use celestial navigation to and from Tahiti.

Credit for the successful completion of the voyage goes to many individuals and organizations within and outside of the Polynesian Voyaging Society. Many Hawaiians however, look with pride to Nainoa Thompson as being their hero through his hard work and the invaluable teachings of Mau that successful navigation by a Hawaiian has become a reality.

Much work is yet to be done. Data which was collected on the trip now has to be interpreted. This hopefully will shed further light on navigating by the stars to modern navigators. Other possible uses of the information may be included in ocean survival techniques as well as voyages to other parts of Polynesia in the future.

Hōʻea mai ka waʻa kaulua ʻo Hōkūleʻa

Me ka pōmaikaʻi o ke Akua ka hoʻolei me nā lei nani ke kanipila leʻa a me ke aloha ua hoʻokipa maila i na poʻe holomoana ma ka waʻa Hōkūleʻa i kā lākou hoʻi hou mai i ka hola ʻekahi o ke awakea ma ka lā ʻeono o June.

He ʻiwakāluakūmālima lā i holo mai ma Tahiti a hiki i ka hōʻea a pae ma Magic Island. Ala Moana Pāka ma Honolulu nei. A aia lā, he mau poʻe i anaina i hoʻokipa me ka hauʻoli. A laila, ua haʻiʻōlelo nā poʻe luna aupuni, ke kiaʻāina Ariyoshi a me ka Mayor Fasi me ka ʻōlelo hoʻomaikaʻi no ka holo moana kaulana. ʻŌlelo ke kiaʻāina, “…it once again demonstrates that in Hawaii the skills and the courage and the ability of the old Hawaiian is not lost but remains with the modern native sons and daughters of Hawaii.”

No ka mea, ʻo ke kanaka hoʻokele waʻa, Nāinoa Thompson, he kanaka mua loa ma hope o ka hala o ke au kahiko e hoʻokele waʻa me nā hōkū a kilo i ke ao lewa me ka moana. A laila, haʻi mai ka Mayor, “The people of Hawaiian ancestry in Hawaii…can show the determination to get any job done that they set their hearts on.”

A kēia holo moana ka holo ʻelua i loaʻa ka pono. ʻO ka holo mua loa ma ka M. H. 1976 na Mau Pialug, he kanaka Maikonia mai i hoike mai i hoʻokele waʻa a i ka hoʻi hou mai ua hoʻokele nā poʻe holo moana me nā mea hoʻokele hou o kēia ao nei. Ma mua o kēia holo ʻelua ua holo ka waʻa Hōkūleʻa ma ka moana a piholo ihola a ua loaʻa ke kaumaha i ka lilo ʻo Eddie Aikau i ke kai.

E hoʻomaikaʻi i nā poʻe o ka Polynesian Voyaging Society a me nā poʻe a pau a me na ʻahahui Hawaiʻi e kākoʻo iā lākou. Haʻaheo nō kākou i ka hana hoʻokele waʻa a Nāinoa Thompson me nā poʻe kānaka holo moana o ka waʻa Hōkūleʻa. Akā, ʻaʻole pau ka hana i kēia manawa no ka mea nui nā mea aʻo i ʻohi ʻia ai a hoʻopaʻa kākau ma ka palapala no laila e nānā pono a ʻimi noiʻi i ka naʻauao. A malia paha e kokua ana i nā poʻe loea e hoʻokele ma kēia ao nei i kā lākou hana ma ka moana nui.

[Now on their worldwide voyage, Mālama Honua!]

(Alahou, 5/1/1980, p. 7)

HOKULEʻA RETURNS

Ke Alahou, Helu 6 & 7, Aoao 7. May-June 1980.

Restoration Day celebration by true patriots, 1894.

LA HOIHOI EA.

Fitting Remembrances for that Great Day.

This past Tuesday, July 31, was the day that the independence and the beloved flag of this land was restored after being seized and forcefully taken by Lord George Paulet [Lo Keoki Pauleti] on February 25, 1843, without orders from his Nation, and Rear-Admiral Thomas [Hope-Adimerala Kamaki] was the one who restored it on this day in that very year, five months and some days after it was stolen. This day is celebrated by all true patriots with many feasts all over the place.

In the early morning, the Royal Hawaiian Band [Puali Puhiohe Lahui] went to entertain the Alii, the Monarch, at Washington Place. When they entered the yard after marching from Emma Square [Ema Kuea], the door was swung open and they marched to the Ewa corner of the house and began to play. The Alii came out and sat on the lanai on that side. The songs that were played were full of reverence, awe, and joy. Outside before the front yard were the masses, and children climbed the fence and went inside. From what we saw, the crowd was looking intensely to try and maybe get a glimpse of the Alii, showing that the songs by the band wasn’t what they desired, but it was the sight of the face and the appearance of the Ruler that they were after, as it is sung: “Our desire is but for our Alii, The one we care for.” [“O ke Alii wale no ka makou makemake, O ka luhi o maua me ia nei.”]

After the music was over, the Alii stood and spoke briefly before these people who stood steadfast behind her, with words of encouragement. She stressed that the lahui keep the peace, like her statement of January 14, 1893, for the welfare of her people, and that it would be but a few more days before, according to assurances she received, that she will once again have them [? e kikoo hou mai ai oia ia lakou] go back to their lives just as before. The Alii had as well some words filled with aloha, and there was not one from amongst the members of the band who did not shed tears; some shed great many tears while blowing their noses into handkerchiefs.

That night, on the grounds of the Hawaiian Hotel [Hotele Hawaii], they gave an open concert to entertain the public, and just as was seen at the performance they put on earlier, so too was this one, and it was very well attended. Those who attended were very happy, there being perhaps 3000, from men to women, from the old to they young, and from those of high stature to low. They played without electric lights, but were illuminated by Japanese lanterns and their pewter lanterns. It would appear as if they were totally thwarted by the Government [P. G.], but in fact it was the deceitful ones who were disappointed, because they were all the more delighted. There was a single wealth-seeking haole [kolea kauahua] that we saw sitting on the lanai of the Hotel, on the Waikiki side, with his mouth wide open, maybe because he witnessed the unmatched beauty of that great night of entertainment, that person was the one with a maimed hand from Boston.

[Let the story never be forgotten. Ua mau ke ea o ka aina i ka pono!]

(Makaainana, 8/6/1894, p. 1)

LA HOIHOI EA.

Ka Makaainana, Buke II—-Ano Hou, Helu 6, Aoao 1. Augate 6, 1894.

William S. Ellis, leader of the glee club accompanying the Royal Hawaiian Band on tour, 1906.

THE ROYAL HAWAIIAN BAND AND THE HAWAIIAN GLEE CLUB.

WILLIAM S. ELLIS, THE LEADER OF THE SINGERS THAT ARE TRAVELLING WITH THE ROYAL HAWAIIAN BAND.

In the month of June, the Royal Hawaiian Band is leaving Honolulu and going on their tour of the states of the United States of America, and their number will increase until it includes forty people. Other than that, the band will go with a Hawaiian glee club that is made up of twenty people.

William S. Ellis formed the glee club going along with the band, and currently there are fifteen skilled singers who are practicing. When the band arrives in San Francisco, this glee club will be increased by the club that is touring America under the leadership of John S. Ellis.

(Kuokoa, 3/9/1906, p. 1)

KA BANA HAWAII A ME KA HUI HIMENI HAWAII.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLIV, Helu 10, Aoao 1. Maraki 9, 1906.

Nane Alapai, 1906.

THE HAPPY-VOICED KAHULI OF THE HAWAIIAN BAND

When the Royal Hawaiian Band and the Hawaiian Glee Club leaves for America in the next month of June, Mrs. Nane Alapai [Nani Alapai], the Beautiful-Voiced Kahuli of the Hawaiian Band will accompany them, should there be no obstructions in her way.

When the band first went with her along, the haole of Portland, where they travelled to, were driven crazy, and that is the reason that there was unequaled exclaim for the beauty of of the singing along with the skill of the band; and their travelling there caused a great interest in Hawaii, which is why there is a great influx in the number of haole coming to the Hawaiian Islands.

Mrs. Nane Alapai [Nani Alapai], was born in Lihue, on the island of Kauai, from the loins of her parents, on the 1st of December, 1874; her parents are Mr. Malina and Keokilele is her mother. And after going around Kauai during her youth, she was taken…

(Kuokoa, 3/16/1906, p. 1)

KE KAHULI LEOLE'A O KA BANA HAWAII.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLIV, Helu 11, Aoao 1. Maraki 16, 1906.

to Honolulu, where she was educated at the Catholic Boarding School for Girls. She married her husband, Mr. W. J. Alapai almost eleven years ago. She has some siblings other than her; five brothers and eight sisters.

When she joined the Royal Hawaiian Band until today, she spent nine years singing before an audience, and during that whole time, her singing has brought much delight in Hawaii’s people and more so in the malihini who come to Hawaii and then go to America; they are so much more delighted; and this is very valuable to Hawaii and to her herself, and this advertises Hawaii’s beauty; the beauty of her ridges, the beauty of her mountains, and the beauty of the songs of her people; it seems there will be a lot of Hawaiian singer born as a result.

(Kuokoa, 3/16/1906, p. 5)

KE KAHULI LEOLE'A O KA BANA HAWAII.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLIV, Helu 11, Aoao 5. Maraki 16, 1906.