23 years of independence, La Kuokoa, 1866.

Independence Day of Hawaii nei.—This past Wednesday, the 28th of November, was the day that the Nation of Hawaii gained its independence from the other power of the nations of Britain and France. On that day in the year 1843, the great powers of Britain and France joined together to discuss the bestowing of independence on this Nation, and the two of them agreed to this and we gained this independence. The great island of Australia under the power of Great Britain, but as for us, we are overjoyed, and can boast that we are amongst the few Independent Nations under the sun. There are many islands like us, who live peacefully under the powers over them, but Hawaii lives clearly without any power placed above its head. Therefore the commemoration by the Hawaiian hearts from the East to the West of these islands on this day, is not a small thing, but it is important, and we know by heart the foundational words of our Nation. “E mau ke ea o ka aina i ka pono.” The gaining of this Independence, was not by the point of a sword or the mouth of a gun, but was gotten peacefully, and upon He who sits on the great Throne is our efforts and great trust, and so let us not be mistaken that the drinking of intoxicating drinks is what preserves our Independence, that is not the case. The past Wednesday was the 23rd year of our commemoration. 21 shots were fired from the hill of Puowina [aka Puowaina], and the day went on peacefully from morning until night.

(Kuokoa, 12/1/1866, p. 3)

Ka La Kuokoa o Hawaii nei.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke V, Helu 48, Aoao 3. Dekemaba 1, 1866.

Independence Day, 1893.

La Kuokoa Song.

E Hawaii e, E Hawaii e
E Hui hauoli pu kakou
Ma keia La nui kamahao
La Kuokoa nou e ka Lahui.

Hui:

La Kuokoa nou e Hawaii
La hauoli no ka Lahui
E ka I, e ka Mahi, me ka Palena
Hui hauoli nui ae kakou.

E Hawaii e, E Hawaii e
Nou keia la me ka ilihia
Na kualono ou e hooho mai
Na kula uli e hauoli pu.

E Hawaii e, E Hawaii e
E Mau ke Ea o ka Aina i ka Pono
Na na Mana Lani e kakoo mai
I kou Kuokoa a mau loa.

Haku ia e

S. K. Kaunamano.

Makapala, Hamakua, Dekemaba 18, 1893.

[Independence Day Song

O Hawaii, O Hawaii
Let us unite in happiness
On this great wonderful day
Independence Day for you, O Lahui.

Chorus:

Your Independence Day, O Hawaii
Joyous day for the Lahui
O I, O Mahi, and Palena
Let us unite in happiness.

O Hawaii, O Hawaii
This is your day, with reverence
May your mountain ridges cheer
May your verdant fields share in the gaiety.

O Hawaii, O Hawaii
May the Sovereignty of the Land be Forever in Righteousness
May the Heavenly Powers lend support
To your Independence for all times.

Composed by S. K. Kaunamano

Makapala, Hamakua, December 18, 1893.]

(Hawaii Holomua, 12/23/1893, p. 1)

La Kuokoa Song.

Hawaii Holomua, Buke I, Helu 14, Aoao 1. Dekemaba 23, 1893.

 

The 1874 speech of Leleiohoku at Kalaupapa, 1891.

THE SPEECH OF THE REGENT, PRINCE LELEIOHOKU, AT THE COLONY OF KALAUPAPA, MOLOKAI.

November 28, 1874.

O Citizens of the Alii, King Kalakaua I., a fraction of his people, aloha to you.

This was the day that we gained the independence of this our mother country, and it is a day for you, Hawaiian people, to rejoice.

In this rejoicing however, there is also something to be anguished and mournful about, for if you turn and look back, there is not your wife, or children, or your family, or the rest, if you are a man who was separated here by the government to come to Kalaupapa; auwe, this is something that pains his heart for his companion, his wife; and so too for the woman who grieves for her husband; and the parent who grieves for his child, and the child for his parent, and so forth.

O Makaainana of King Kalakaua I., living in this friendless land, you have but one friend, that being the protection of the government.

This painful burden that you have been stricken with does not come through the control of the child of man, but comes from God.

Therefore, all you makaainana who have aloha for your alii, I am one of your parents, but I am powerless to divert the power of the law, for I am but a student of the law; yet it pains me to see you, O Beloved makaainana; I first saw some of you turning your faces away from mine.

But should there be a time in the future, when the rule falls totally upon me, then that will be the time when I will search out and put my efforts into finding relief for all of us, but that lies in the hands of the one who created us.

Therefore, O Beloved makaainana, do forgive me, and may the power of the Lord help us all.

[You never know where you will find information. I have not been able to find mention of this speech by Leleiohoku in 1874, but 17 years later…]

(Leo o ka Lahui, 9/25/1891, p. 2)

KA HAIOLELO A KE KAHU AUPUNI, KE KEIKI ALII LELEIOHOKU...

Ka Leo o ka Lahui, Buke II, Helu 289, Aoao 2. Sepatemaba 25, 1891.

Plans for Independence Day, 1885.

The heads of the nation are planning on a great celebration on the 28th of November, that being La Kuokoa. Therefore, there will be a parade on that day; a speech by Robert Hoapili Baker [R. Hoapili Beka] at Kaumakapili for independence day, the one that we are questioning as to whether he has a brain that can compose a speech for that day by himself; and a banquet for the benefit of Kaumakapili Church after the activities at the church are through. This is something new that we see, that the heads of the nation themselves are doing this, and not the makaainana. Perhaps it was seen that the makaainana were neglectful in observing this day because of their lack of trust in the ministers of the government.

(Ko Hawaii Pae Aina, 11/14, 1885, p. 2)

Ke manao nei na luna aupuni...

Ko Hawaii Pae Aina, Buke VIII, Helu 46, Aoao 2. Novemaba 14, 1885.

Alii are moved from Pohukaina to Maunaala, 1865.

Found under: “HUNAHUNA MEA HOU O HAWAII NEI.”]

The transfer of the Remains of the Royal Ones who died before to the New Cemetery of the Alii.—On the night of this past Monday, the bodies of the alii who died in the past were moved, and this is the order. First was Kamehameha II; the second was Queen Kamamalu; third was Kamehameha III; fourth was Kaahumanu I; the fifth was Kinau, who was Kaahumanu II; sixth was Kamanele; the seventh was Adamu Paki [Abner Paki]; the eighth was L. Konia [Laura Konia]; the ninth was Mose Kekuaiwa [Moses Kekuaiwa]; the tenth was Davida [David Kamehameha]; the eleventh was W. P. Leleiohoku [William Pitt Leleiohoku]; the twelfth was J. P. Kinau [John William Pitt Kinau]; the thirteenth was Keola [Keolaokalani Davis Bishop]; the fourteenth was Keaweaweula; the fifteenth was Liloa and Lonoikamakahiki in one coffin. The court favorites, Kauka Luka [Thomas Charles Byde Rooke]; Keoni Ana [John Young]; Namakeha [Bennet Y. Namakeha]; Lahilahi [Jane K. Lahilahi], the daughter of Keoni Ana.

The others remaining at Pohukaina were Kekauluohi; Kaiminaauao; and Haalilio [Timoteo Haalilio], the famed emissary of the Hawaiian Islands, who faced the cold seas of the United States, Britain, and France.

(Kuokoa, 11/4/1865, p. 2)

Ka hoihoi ia ana...

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke IV, Helu 44, Aoao 2. Novemaba 4, 1865.

Tahitian mele for La Kuokoa, 1861.

Songs of Polapola

Aue oe tau hoa hele e,
E fiteri tou e,
Tai ta pea ta te fa tu,
O Iesu ta haa maitai.

Eau ia oe te oa oa,
Eau ia oe te haa maitai,
Ia oe nae te fei a haa wale,
I loto i te au ahi oia nae.

Aue oe e ta Moi e,
He aroha to oe,
Mai horoa i te hau ia Mareta,
E ta pea maitai.

Iaorana oe e ta Hatu o Hawaii,
Tai haapao ia tai haapao hia,
E mono i tooe toloa.

Iaorana oe e Ema,
Te Alii Vahine e,
Faatere maitai to otou haue,
E mau te ora o te Alii e amuri no atu.

Auwe oe tou hoa he re e,
Pi te ri tou e tei ta pea i ta te fatu,
Oietu te parau maitai,
eau ia oe te oaoa,
Eau ia oe te haa maitai,
Ia oto nae te feia faa vare,
I roto o te au ahi oia nae.

Auwe oe e ta Moi e,
E aroha to oe e,
Mai ho roa i te hau,
Ia Amerita,
E ta pea maitai mai,
Iaorana oe e ta Hatu Hawaii e,
Tei haa pao hia i mano to oe to roa,
Iaorana oe e Ema te Rii vahine e,
Faa te re maitai to otou hau,
E mau te aroha o te Rii e,
Ea muri noatu.

Himeni 27.

1 Te ra, te aoae, te fetia,
Maramarama ai te ao,
Maitai atoa ai te po,
Na te Atua i faaue iho,

2 Ia ara, e ia moe tatou,
Te merahi maitai tei mau,
To ratou tiai ia tatou,
Aore e ino i roohia mai.

3 Te rai anaana i nia ae,
Te aihere rii i raro nei,
Te miti atoa e ati ae,
Na te Atua i hamani.

4 Te puapua, noanoa,
Unauna ai te raau nei,
Te raau maa na tatou a,
Na te Atua i horoa mai.

5 Te ata i pee, te ua i pou,
Te matai farara e oraʻi,
Te manu, i rere nei,
Te mau puaa nana anae,

6. Te ia e tere i te tai,
Tei nee i raro i te repo,
Tatiou atoa te taata nei,
Ohipa na te Atua mau.

7 Ia hamanihia ra tatou
Ia hau tu teie i te maitai,
E ia ra oe ta te Arii parau,
Ma te aau au i a rue ai.

[These are some of the mele performed on the 28th of November, 1861, at Kawaiahao Church in celebration of Independence Day.

For more Tahitian mele, see this composition of Ninito and Manaiula Sumner for Victoria Kaahumanu from 1862.]

(Kuokoa, 12/2/1861, p. 2)

He Mele Polapola.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke I, Helu 4, Aoao 2. Dekemaba 2, 1861.

The Ninth Independence Day, 1852.

Chamberlain’s Notice.

The public are hereby notified that Sunday, the 28th of this month, being the ninth Anniversary of the Joint-Declaration of Great Britain and France to respect the independence of this Kingdom, the day will be kept on Monday, the 29th, as a holiday in the usual manner.

Their Majesties, the King and Queen will hold Court in the Palace at half past 7 o’clock, in the evening, whereat there will be a public reception.

Strangers, (Ladies or gentlemen) desirous of being presented, are requested to bring with them cards signed by the Consuls of their several nations.

A. PAKI

Chamberlain’s Office, Nov. 12, 1852.

[The 9th anniversary of La Kuokoa was celebrated under the reign of King Kamehameha III, Kauikeaouli and Queen Kapakuhaili.]

(Polynesian, 11/20/1852, p. 110)

Chamberlain's Notice.

The Polynesian, Volume 9, Number 28, Page 110. November 20, 1852.

La Kuokoa information and more… 1700–1999.

For those of you interested, i came across this British Newspaper Archive site. It is unfortunately not free access. But if you want to know what their newspapers were saying about Haalilio and Richards and Paulet and Charlton as it all was going down (or other events that occurred between 1700–1999), it might be worth paying the subscription. Here for example there seem to be some four-thousand articles in the 1840s found using the search term “Sandwich Islands”:

http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/search/results/1840-01-01/1849-12-31?basicsearch=sandwich%20islands&exactsearch=false&page=0

And for the same period, there are five hits for “Haalilio”:

http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/search/results/1840-01-01/1849-12-31?basicsearch=haalilio&exactsearch=false

[Being that it is a pay for view site, i don’t believe that i would be able to repost articles found there even if i spent the money for a subscription myself…]

45th La Kuokoa celebration, 1888.

INDEPENDENCE DAY.

This coming Tuesday, November 28th, is the forty-fifth year celebration marking the recognition by the Heads of the Nations of Great Britain and France of Hawaiian independence; this day is set aside as a holiday all across the land. In other lands which enjoy independence through learning and enlightenment, independence day is seen as a day of rebirth for the nation and victory. These are great events found in the history of Hawaii’s friendly international relations; this is a distinction not received by any other island here in Polynesia; it has been nearly half a century that we remain proud of her unwavering  independence—progress—and enlightenment.

Long Live Hawaii Under God.

[On this the 170th anniversary of La Kuokoa, what are you doing to remember the great efforts taken by those like Timoteo Haalilio and William Richards to gain independence for the Nation?]

(Kuokoa, 11/24/1888, p. 2)

KA LA KUOKOA.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXVII, Helu 47, Aoao 2. Novemaba 24, 1888.

More on Hawaiian Independence Day and Aloha Aina, 1843.

THE ANT [KA NONANONA].

“Go to the ant, thou sluggard; consider her ways, and be wise.” Proverbs [Solomona]

Book 2. HONOLULU, OAHU, JANUARY 17, 1843. Paper 17.

Here are some letters from Haalilio; people will surely be happy to hear from him and Mr. Richards that their travels are going well.

Weletabu [Vera Cruz ?], Mexico, Nov. 2, 1842.

Dr. G. P. Judd,

My dear friend, much aloha to you and your entire household. Here am I, your friend, with feeling aloha for you. The two of us [Haalilio and Richards] arrived here on the 29th of October, and we are awaiting a ship to ride. Hear me, I am doing fine, I have no illness; my health is fine now. However, I do not know how it will be when we get to the cold lands; perhaps it will be alright, and perhaps not. Hear me, we have travelled about this expansive land with peacefully, we were not troubled, we were cared for well by the Lord, until arriving here. But our bodies are spent after the long road. The days were extremely hot and extremely cold; we got drenched by the rain and snow, we passed through mountains, and rivers, and the wilds here in Mexico; we swam the water of rivers running by the face of the mountains, during the day and the night. In the cold and the heat, we endured hunger, riding on the backs of mules all day long. But I was certain that Jesus was with us in this friendless land. And that he blesses us. He takes care of the two of us, and our bodies are not troubled or hurt. He supplies us with all of our needs. He has welcomed us always amongst good friends; and there, we were given comfort and help on our path.

Listen to this, I’ve seen the towns of these lands; they are countless, and I have seen Mexico the great Town of the president [alii]. I’ve also seen the silver mines, and how they work silver; we’ve been to the legislature of the alii and his residence. Those places are grand to see. And today I am with health, giving my aloha to you and your wife and the children; give your [my?] aloha to all the friends there, and to Hana folks and to your people and to my household, and to the land and to the chiefs.

Aloha between us, Let us live through the Lord; until we meet in joy once more.

Timoteo Haalilio.

Mexico, Weletabu [Vera Cruz ?], Nov. 8, 1842.

O D. [G.] P. Judd,

Much Aloha to you; we received your letter on this day, the 8th of Nov., 1842. And we’ve understand all that was within. I have much aloha for you, and for all of you. How sad for all the alii, and how sad for Kapihi! We have been blessed this day in seeing your letter. There is much aloha for us all and our homeland. We are travelling aboard the American warships, Falmouth [Falamaka], to New Orleans [Nuolina]. A steam-powered American warship arrived, a huge vessel, 247 feet long and 2,400 tons. As I watch her sail by steam, it is a fantastic sight; she is so swift, with no comparison; this is the first time I’ve seen a steamer, and I am totally captivated by it.

Much aloha for you; here we are safe, steadfast in our duties we swore to.

Aloha to you.  T. Haalilio.

The two of them are headed to Washington aboard the steamer, a warship named Missouri, and perhaps they will land in Washington in 9 days.

[Does anyone know if Weletabu in Mexico is Vera Cruz, or if it is somewhere else?

Also, who is the Hana and the Kapihi mentioned here?]

(Nonanona, 1/17/1843, p. 81)

Eia mai kekahi mau palapala no Haalilio mai...

Ka Nonanona, Buke 2, Pepa 17, Aoao 81. Ianuari 17, 1843.