Maunaala, 1899.

ROYAL MAUSOLEUM

(THIS IMPOSING STRUCTURE STANDS ON AN ELEVATION PROMINENT IN THAT PORTION OF NUUANU CEMETERY ON THE WAIKIKI SIDE OF THE AVENUE. WITHIN WILL BE DEPOSITED THE REMAINS OF PRINCESS KAIULANI.)

WITHIN THE TOMB.

(This paper, February 16, 1891.)

On a beautiful lawn at the entrance of Nuuanu valley, overlooking this city, the harbor and ocean beyond, stands the Royal Mausoleum, erected by the Hawaiian Government, as the resting place of the remains of the Royal Family of Hawaii and a few of their greatest benefactors. It is built in the Gothic style of architecture, of concrete stone, with the lawn handsomely laid out with walks and studded with trees, the whole presenting from the avenue an attractive appearance. Continue reading

Alii are moved from Pohukaina to Maunaala, 1865.

Found under: “HUNAHUNA MEA HOU O HAWAII NEI.”]

The transfer of the Remains of the Royal Ones who died before to the New Cemetery of the Alii.—On the night of this past Monday, the bodies of the alii who died in the past were moved, and this is the order. First was Kamehameha II; the second was Queen Kamamalu; third was Kamehameha III; fourth was Kaahumanu I; the fifth was Kinau, who was Kaahumanu II; sixth was Kamanele; the seventh was Adamu Paki [Abner Paki]; the eighth was L. Konia [Laura Konia]; the ninth was Mose Kekuaiwa [Moses Kekuaiwa]; the tenth was Davida [David Kamehameha]; the eleventh was W. P. Leleiohoku [William Pitt Leleiohoku]; the twelfth was J. P. Kinau [John William Pitt Kinau]; the thirteenth was Keola [Keolaokalani Davis Bishop]; the fourteenth was Keaweaweula; the fifteenth was Liloa and Lonoikamakahiki in one coffin. The court favorites, Kauka Luka [Thomas Charles Byde Rooke]; Keoni Ana [John Young]; Namakeha [Bennet Y. Namakeha]; Lahilahi [Jane K. Lahilahi], the daughter of Keoni Ana.

The others remaining at Pohukaina were Kekauluohi; Kaiminaauao; and Haalilio [Timoteo Haalilio], the famed emissary of the Hawaiian Islands, who faced the cold seas of the United States, Britain, and France.

(Kuokoa, 11/4/1865, p. 2)

Ka hoihoi ia ana...

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke IV, Helu 44, Aoao 2. Novemaba 4, 1865.

Twenty-one peals of thunder for the People’s King, 1875.

[Found under: “Nu Hou Kuloko.”]

Some people have reported to us that from the beginning of the transportation of the remains of Lunalilo from the Royal Mausoleum at Maemae until entering his crypt at Kawaiahao, there were exactly 21 peals of thunder. Should that be the truth, it is something remarkable.

[The first funeral procession on February 28, 1874 took Lunalilo to the Royal Mausoleum, because his crypt was not yet complete, and then on November 23, 1875, as this article states, his remains were moved to his final resting place at Kawaiahao.

For even more accounts on this amazing occurrence, see https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10201289583821168&set=a.10200741355595805.1073741841.1219578864&type=1&theater]

(Kuokoa, 11/27/1875, p. 2)

Ua hai mai kekahi poe...

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XIV, Helu 48, Aoao 2. Novemaba 27, 1875.

Beginnings of Royal Mausoleum at Mauna Ala, 1865.

Royal Mausoleum.—We have heard that an agreement has been reached between the Minister of  the Interior and  T. C. Heuck, Esq., to commence once again, during these days, the work on the Royal Mausoleum at Mauna Ala in Nuuanu. The stones are ready, and everything is prepared for the building to be built, and hereafter all the native born will be pleased to see this grand memorial building where the parents of the populace who have left the light of the world lay to rest.

(Au Okoa, 4/24/1865, p. 2)

Ka Ilina Alii.

Ke Au Okoa, Buke I, Helu 1, Aoao 2. Aperila 24, 1865.

The royal mausoleum converted into a chapel, 1922.

DEDICATED AS A CHAPEL

On this past Sunday, that being the birthday of the Royal Representative Kuhio, the mausoleum that holds the bones of the alii of Hawaii nei in the cemetery of Nuuanu was made into a chapel for all the Hawaiian societies of Honolulu who wish to hold services there.

This house of the Chiefs was consecrated by the Bishop L. A. Motte [John D. LaMothe] of the Anglican Church [hoomana Pelekane] and assisted by Rev. S. L. Desha, Sr. of Hilo, as was planned earlier.

There were many people who came to see the consecration, and the ceremony was done with much reverence. This will likely make this house of the Alii a unforgettable [?] monument to all the alii of Hawaii.

[Much of the Hilo newspaper, Hoku o Hawaii, is digitized badly, and can hardly be read. This particular article is one of the better ones. I hope all of the illegible articles are not important ones!]

(Hoku o Hawaii, 3/30/1922, p. 3)

HOOLAAIA I HALEPULE

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Buke XV, Helu 44, Aoao 3. Maraki 30, 1922.