More on the Hilo celebrations of Chinese New Year, 1883.

[Found under: “NU HOU KULOKO.”]

Truly shameful were the actions of some women at Paukaa, Hilo, Hawaii. Continue reading

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Clarence A. Crozier did not like what he saw on Niihau, 1946.

Isolation Of Niihau Is Blasted

(Additional Story on Page 2)

The pall of isolation that has made Niihau a forbidden island will be torn asunder if Santor Clarence A. Crozier, Maui, has his way.

A member of a senatorial party which visited the island Tuesday, Senator Crozier did not like what he saw and promised to do something about it.

“Niihau, which has been preserved for three generations by the Robinson family as a last refuge of primitive Hawaii, is 80 years behind the times,” Senator Crozier said.

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Rev. Ella Wise Harrison visits Niihau, 1946.

Rebuttal.

Due to what was spread some time ago about Niihau people, like the Committee selected to watch Niihau. Those committees returned and submitted their report.

Rev. Ella Wise Harrison, the kahu of the Akua Ola Church, left for Niihau and spent three weeks there with family and friends. Continue reading

Suggests back a suggestion to Maui News, 1903.

We do not need any of your sarcasm, Mr. Man of the Maui News. It may have been well meant, yet we fail to see it in that light, for “scholarly” we do not claim to be, but surely, we are “scholarly” as far as our own mother tongue is concerned, which is something that you, aged malihini, cannot touch nor express yourself upon.

Continue reading

For those who believe anything on Facebook. 1908.

That letter from Kalawao.

The English article that was printed in one of the English newspapers of Honolulu nei, from S. K. Maialoha of Kalawao, Molokai, is clear to the editor of this paper, that it is not a letter written in English by S. K. Maialoha, because the editor of this paper is familiar with S. K. Maialoha, and he is not someone skilled in English. Continue reading

Makee Aupuni responds to that Mrs. W. Hall, 1893.

That Minneapolis Letter.

Editor Bulletin:—

It is not easy to realize the fact that any woman having an atom of regard for that high sense of honor of which truth is the basis could pen such a letter as you published on Saturday, even though it were not intended, as may be supposed, for publication. Is this Mrs. W. Hall, who now traduces the Queen, in innuendo too utterly vile and baseless for repetition, the same Mrs. W. Hall who for years has been the seeming friend of the Queen, and members of the same religious organization? The public will remember that about a year and a half ago the W. C. T. U. [Women’s Christian Temperance Union], of which Mrs. W. Hall is a leading light, conceived the brilliant idea of opening a coffee-shop in the Queen Emma Hall. The enterprise was ushered in with a great flourish of religious trumpets and the usual benedictions were pronounced on the undertaking, and the creme de la creme of local “Christian business men promised to boom up the good work. But, lo, there are expenses confronting the ladies of the “Union” in starting the movement and to whom do they go? Not to the millionaire merchants their husbands and others, but to the Queen. Yes, to Queen Liliuokalani, gentle reader in Minneapolis, did Mrs. W. Hall and her sisters of the Honolulu W. C. T. U. go for the fifty-two dollars for the license, and the gift of a bag of Kona coffee and other incidentals necessary to the starting of that enterprise which was to do so much for temperance and didn’t; for after having flickered through a feeble existence of four or five months the Queen’s bag of coffee gave out, and the “movement” ceased to  move, and the word “closed” was written on the front door of the “enterprise,” and the Queen’s money might have been as well thrown into the sea, and the only residue of this coffee episode is a reminder that between pious temperance and professional missionary the kaleidoscopic picture of “Christian” character as presented by the latest local doctrinaires must appear to the Hawaiian “very pronounced” indeed, as a compound variety of intolerance, hypocrisy and unmitigated greed. Continue reading

Mrs. William Hall, 1893.

HAWAII.

Mrs. William Hall Tells of the Arrival of Commissioner Blount.

Disappointment Created by the Taking Down of Old Glory.

How Annexation is Viewed by the People of the Sandwich Islands.

The Daily Rumors Which Alternately Buoy the Annexationists and Royalists.

The following letter from Honolulu was written to Minneapolis friends by Mrs. William Hall, daughter of Mrs. C. O. Van Cleve, the wife of a missionary to the Sandwich islands, and has resided on the islands for the past 30 years. Mrs. Hall’s husband is also a son of a missionary. The story of the courtship and marriage is romantic, for Mr. Hall was visiting Minneapolis when he met Miss Van Cleve, and he fell in love with her at sight. He had only a short time to remain, and as Gen. Van Cleve was then out with a command,the impatient young lover made the journey to the general’s station to tell him he had laid siege to the the daughter’s heart, and that she would surrender if the father gave his consent. Miss Van Cleve afterwards went out to the Sandwich islands, where she was married and began missionary labors with her husband. The letter was written early in April, just after the lowering of the American flag on the islands.

Honolulu, April 5, 1893.

Just as we were in the midst of writing for the mail by the Australia last Wednesday, the telephone announced a United States steamer off Koko Head, supposed to be the revenue cutter Richard Rush, bringing commissioners from Washington to the Hawaiian government. This proved to be correct, and hurrying our letters, we repaired to the water front to see what was to be seen.

The streets were full of people and full of flags. Chicago will hardly fly more bunting to the square yard at the opening of the Columbian Exposition. Everyone hung out a flag of some kind, mostly American, though I noticed “The harp that once through Tara’s halls the soul of music shed,” is hanging “mute” on a green field between two brick buildings on the corner of Fort and Hotel streets, and I think likely, if the trade wind continues as vigorous as at present a few days longer, the cord (chord) will “indignant break.” But to return to our muttons, otherwise streets.

One feature of the display was a procession of native women dressed in white and bearing Hawaiian and American flags, marching down to the wharf to receive and welcome the commissioners.

The Rush entered the harbor and took her place in the naval row. The American minister, the consul, and a committee of three gentlemen boarded her from a steam launch just before she entered the harbor.

It soon became noised abroad that only one commissioner had arrived, and he would not  land for an hour or two. There was some disappointment among the natives when they heard that Admiral Brown had not been sent; others did not quite know whether to be glad or sorry that only one man had been entrusted with this mission.

Soon after the cutter anchored, Maj. Robertson, the ex-queen’s chamberlain, went on board and, presenting the queen’s compliments, offered the commission her carriage in which to ride to the hotel. The offer was declined with thanks, the commissioner had already declined several offers of the kind, preferring to ride in his private carriage. Continue reading