Funeral of Konia, 1857.

The Funeral of Konia.

The obsequies of the late chiefess Konia were performed on Tuesday, and notwithstanding the sickness which has been so general prevented numbers of persons from attending, the aggregate of those collected to show their respect on the occasion was very large, whilst the crowd that thronged both sides of the streets, as the procession moved along, was so great as to require a strong force to preserve the line of march from the late residence of the deceased lady to the Royal cemetery, in which the coffin was placed. The religious services were performed by the Rev. Mr. Clark, and the ceremony was conducted throughout with a decorum and feeling which was remarked by all present.

(Polynesian, 8/8/1857, p. 108)

The Funeral of Konia.

The Polynesian, Volume XIV, Number 14, Page 108. August 8, 1857.

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Even more from the Deshas, 1944.

Our Day

THE CALM SEAS OF KONA

These past days, the Rev. Desha went to Hilo for a conference of pastors held there. He went with Rev. Paul Morimoto and Rev. and Mrs. James Upchurch. Rev. Desha said that this was one of the finest Conferences.

Rev. Desha planned to go to Honolulu once the Conference in Hilo was over for the birthday of his Aunty, Mrs. Bella [Isabella] Desha, and those who know her as Mother Desha. But he gave up this idea to go when he hear that his cousin, Alika Desha, left this life, the youngest son of Mother Desha. How regretful for these young Hawaiians.

Alika [Alexander] Desha was born in Honolulu, and he was forty-nine years old. He was educated at the government schools of Honolulu and Hilo. He married Emma Ukauka of Honolulu and from this union they had five children. For over twenty-five years he worked for the store of P. C. Beamer, his brother-in-law, in Hilo.

The family from Honolulu who came for the funeral was Mother Desha [Isabella Desha], mother of the deceased; Mrs. Ida Becker, sister; David Desha, older brother, Mr. and Mrs. John R. Desha, cousins; and the children, Capt. Adolph Desha, Alec Jr. and Vivian. The funeral was held in the afternoon of Thursday, January 13, 1944. The first funeral congregation was held Elmore Funeral Home for the family and friends. Rev. Moses Moku and Rev. Desha performed the service. The final funeral congregation was held at the Masonic Hall under the direction of the Masons, and there were many friends who came.

The celebration of the birthday of Mother Desha was not neglected, but the children and grandchildren of the one whose day it was gathered in the morning of the Sabbath and honored her with a very nice party. She is eighty years old.

(Hoku o Hawaii, 1/26/1944, p. 1)

Ko Maua La

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Volume XXXVIII, Number 40, Aoao 1. Ianuari 26, 1944.

Funeral of Lucy Lusia Lulea Kaiamoku Muolo Moehonua, 1865.

[Found under: “HUNAHUNA MEA HOU O HAWAII NEI.”]

Funeral Performed.—Shortly after half past 3 o’clock, the funeral procession of Mrs. Lucy L. K. Moehonua began from their home until Kawaiahao Church, in the evening of the Sabbath, the 15th of this October. A short eulogy was read by the Rev. H. H. Parker [H. H. Pareka], and after that, the Rev. M. Kuaea rose and spoke on the passage 1 Thessalonians 4:18. It was not long after he was done speaking when the congregation was soon let out and the remains of Mrs. Lucy L. K. Moehonua were taken to be placed in her crypt, Hoakalei.

This crypt [hale kupapau] is the best in the cemetery of Kawaiahao, and in all of the nation of Hawaii nei. It is an unusual sight; it has four gables [kala] fashioned in the form of a cross; one gable faces the rising sun, one to the west, and the others to the north and south. And the cost for the building was nearly $800.00.

(Kuokoa, 10/21/1865, p. 2)

Ua Hoolewaia.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke IV, Helu 42, Aoao 2. Okatoba 21, 1865.

Painting of lying in state of Queen Liliuokalani by Lionel Walden? 1917.

LIONEL WALDEN TO PUT CHURCH SCENE INTO COLOR

Lionel Walden, noted artist, whose representations of Hawaiian scenes met with great favor here and elsewhere, was occupied yesterday in making a sketch of the interior of Kawaiahao church. The painting on which Mr. Walden will be at work again this morning will give to posterity a vivid and realistic picture of the lying in state of the last of Hawaii’s monarchs. The somber background, setting off in brilliant contrast the many beautiful flowers that are being sent to the dead queen, the tall kahilis, the graceful palms, the waiting people, will have proper place in the picture, and dominating all will be the royal casket, with its covering of feather cape, its tabu sticks guarding the queen in death as her proud station guarded her in life, while surrounding her stand the faithful kahili-bearers, keeping the last vigil over the last ruler of a vanished kingdom.

[Wow. Does anyone know if this painting was completed and if so, where it is now?]

(Honolulu Star-Bulletin, 11/15/1917, p. 2)

LIONEL WALDEN TO PUT CHURCH SCENE INTO COLOR

Honolulu Star-Bulletin, Volume XXV, Number 7985, Page 2. November 15, 1917.

Names of the stevedores who participate in Queen Liliuokalani’s funeral, 1917.

204 HAWAIIAN WATERFRONT MEN IN LINE DRAW THE GREAT CATAFALQUE

Poolas Pay Last Tribute to Queen in Unique Observance, Carrying Out Customs of Other Days—Lighted Kukui Nut Torches Emblematic of Liliuokalani’s Dynasty

HOMAGE as in the days of ancient Hawaii was done to their dead ruler by the “poolas” or stevedores of Honolulu as their part in the long ceremonial procession on Sunday—204 of them.

The poolas, untied as a craft into a well-knit society, paid their tribute to Liliuokalani as along crowded streets they drew the great catafalque bearing the casket in which reposed the body. No section of the long parade was more impressive than this.

With solemn tread stevedores marched through the streets of Honolulu to the Royal Mausoleum, Nuuanu street, drawing by long ropes the somber catafalque upon which rested the handsome koa coffin. It was a unique, fitting portion of the elaborate ceremonies attending the burial of the queen. The poolas in the lines were all Hawaiians, members of that sturdy race from which Liliuokalani sprung.

The great body of men was in perfect order at all times. The poolas were dressed in white and each wore a small cape of red yellow, colors of the organization that loads and unloads the steamers that touch here. The leaders wore long cloaks. Samuel Kipi was in charge of the poolas, and was assisted by Joseph Pua, John Lono, Benjamin Ross, Hookani, Kapele Napua, Kawaipaoa, John Kapono, Jr., and David B. Kekuewa.

Two long lines of ropes, bound with black and white ribbon, formed the harness with which the poolas drew the catafalque. Just before the coffin was removed from the throne room, the poolas formed a double line in front of the catafalque which reached almost to the makai entrance to the Palace grounds, each man taking hold of the rope. as the coffin was carried down the steps, the poolas removed their hats and stood at attention, facing the catafalque. After the ceremonies at the entrance to the palace were over, they began their steady march to the mausoleum, slowly drawing the catafalque after them.

The catafalque, draped in black, and trimmed with narrow lines of white, rolled slowly behind the marchers. A large canopy of black was supported by four posts, and at the four corners, on top, were black plumes. Before the poolas moved out of the palace grounds, torches of kukui nuts, bound in ti-leaves, were lighted, a final honor to the royal dead.

Following is a list of the poolas who conveyed the remains of the queen to their final resting place:

Mookini, Polokami, Henry Mahoe, J. Manu, Hoomanawanui, J. Kekuku, Sam Hakuole, Robert Kauhane, Moses Keala, D. Kali, K. Kamaka, J. Moolina, John Hali, Kila, Lui Pawaa, Ben Kaleo, Kalama Opio, William Watson, Jr., Frank Kiekie, John Lono, Lai Pila, Joseph Haili, H. Halemano, Herring, Keliikipi, G. M. Napoleon, James Kekino, William Swain, Kalani Isaac, Jr., Jose Salona, J. M. Kipi, William Malina, G. Kailihou, Makekau, S. Kahololio, Woodward, J. Kamaka, P. Keawehaku, Joe Keola, John Ena, John Manono, Victor K. Kilia, Charles Panui, Kuhiakau, John Neoliwa, James Spencer, James Nuuhiwa, E. Kaai, John Maielua, Sam Peter, Joe Kapua, Pukani Maui, Koikoi Opio, David Poepoe, William Kamakee, Albert Kupo, George Kaili, Sam Lili, J. K. Kuulei, Tom Bright, Kaaha Kuili, J. Enos, G. Halemano, John Kanalu, D. Kuhiau, G. Apiki, Kawaiaea, S. Akana, John Ku, H. Iona, Tom Kepane, Kukila, M. Enos, J. Nawai, W. Lui, C. Kaninau, Needham, Kaowaka, W. Harrison, S. Kalauao, M. Koili, L. Kia, Pokai, M. Kalahiwa, McShane, B. Purdy, A. Kaleikini, J. Kaluna, D. Kalauawa, Pooloa, D. Kahalewai, John Kamaka, Kukaulaili, Poai Kekuaana, William Kaka, B. Holokai, J. Kamai, D. Kamaka, M. Naone, Pua Ku, John Kamao, Kahieki, John Halemano, Niauhoe, D. Palau, Keliinoi, H. Keanui, Kalaluhi, Sam Peahi, Nahuina, Iopa, Kealoha, Thomas F. Wond, W. Jury, J. Kailihiwa, Robert Jury, John Philips, John Kaimipau, Kawanui, Hoonuu, W. Pualoa, Alohikea, E. Mohia, E. Lono, C. Papaiku, Dan Kekaulike, W. Simpson, D. Kaai, Sam Pali, D. Kaaihue, Moke, Makuku, J. Keahi, Sam Iaea, Kamaka, Sam Kipi, De La Cruz, David Kuuku, K. Napua, J. Alohikea, Koawane, Maemae, S. Levi, Sam Kaili, Joe Kekaula, Liftee, Kupihea, Halelaau, John Kauinana, Kahan, Aika, E. D. Ele, Pukui, Kawaipaoa, Ben Ross, P. K. Kapu, D. Lonohiwa, W. Kalimahana, W. Kealakai, J. H. H. Kealakai, George Hookano, Sam Ahia, John Lino, Jack Kamaka, M. Correa, Nahinu, M. Miguel, H. Aki, D. Kekuewa, Waiolama, Joe Pawaa, Joseph Hale, Pohau, Charles Aniu, John Kauwa, Laniawe, Nunu, Sam Kaakau, William Hemekela, Maui, Kuaana, Waha, Kelli, A. Paaluhi, William Kahala, Kikaukahi, Ben Kekoa, Kamaki Pila, Pauoa, Kapono, Keawe Loloaniho, Kune Elua, John Kalimapehu, John Brown, Charles Honolii, James Kaai, Joseph Lui, H. Williams, Alex. Robertson, John King, Dick Helenihi, Naauao, Kainoa, Hanape.

(Honolulu Star-Bulletin, 11/19/1917, p. 7)

204 HAWAIIAN WATERFRONT MEN IN LINE DRAW THE GREAT CATAFALQUE

Honolulu Star-Bulletin, Volume XXV, Number 7988, Page 7. November 19, 1917.

King Kamehameha III’s funeral procession announcement, 1854.

ORDER OF PROCESSION

FOR THE FUNERAL OF

HIS LATE MAJESTY, KING KAMEHAMEHA III.

GRAND MARSHAL.

MARSHAL.

HAWAIIAN CALVARY.

PHYSICIANS.

CLERGYMEN OF ALL DENOMINATIONS.

FREE MASONS.

Odd Fellows.

ROYAL SCHOOL.

FACULTY AND STUDENTS OF OAHU COLLEGE.

OTHER SCHOOLS WITH THEIR MASTERS, ALL SIX DEEP.

ARTILLERY.

THE KING’S BAND.

HOUSEHOLD TROOPS.

THE KING’S PURVEYOR AND SERVANTS.

THE PHYSICIAN AND ASSISTING PHYSICIAN OF THE LATE KING.

TWO KAHILIS.

THE LATE KING’S STANDARD.

SOLDIERS. HIGH CHIEFS. SMALL KAHILIS. [COFFIN] SMALL KAHILIS. HIGH CHIEFS. SOLDIERS.

TWO KAHILIS.

HER MAJESTY, THE QUEEN.

HER ROYAL HIGHNESS, THE PRINCESS VICTORIA, HIS MAJESTY, THE KING, HIS ROYAL HIGHNESS, PRINCE KAMEHAMEHA.

THE KING’S CHANCELLOR, THE CHAMBERLAIN, THE KUHINA NUI.

THE MNINISTERS.

THE REPRESENTATIVES OF FOREIGN NATIONS.

The Governors of Islands.

THE MEMBERS OF THE PRIVY COUNCIL AND LADIES OF THE COURT.

THE FOREIGN CONSULS, AND THE POST CAPTAINS, COMMANDERS AND OFFICERS OF SHIPS OF WAR.

The Judges, Officers of Customs and other Government Officers,—Four deep.

Drummers.

HAWAIIAN INFANTRY.

FIRST HAWAIIAN GUARD.

FOREIGN MARINES, TAKING PLACE ACCORDING TO THE RANK AND SENIORITY OF THEIR RESPECTIVE COMMANDERS.

Fire Companies, four deep.

Hook and Ladder Company, four deep.

The King’s Yeomanry,—Four deep.

THE FOREIGN RESIDENTS AND FOREIGNERS BELONGING TO FOREIGN MERCHANT VESSELS,—SIX DEEP.

The native Population generally,—eight deep.

SOLDIERS,—FOUR DEEP.

————

Those who attend the Funeral to assemble at the Palace at 10, A. M., on Saturday, the 6th of January, and the Procession to start at 11.

The LIne of Procession will be formed on the north side of King Street, fronting the Palace, the right resting on Richard St. Those who proceed with the remains of his late Majesty, will take their position North of the Palace, towards Richards Street. The public, generally, are invited to attend.

M. KEKUANAOA, Grand Marshal.

PALACE, DECEMBER 20, 1854.

(Polynesian, 12/30/1854, p. 1)

ORDER OF PROCESSION

The Polynesian, Volume XI, Number 34, Page 1. December 30, 1854.

Mortuary of Manuel E. Silva, 1910.

THE RESIDENCE UNDERTAKING PARLOR is the latest move in the undertaking line, where families can be accommodated with sleeping quarters, dining room, kitchen and bathroom. Call and inspect. 34 Chaplain Lane.

M. E. Silva’s Up-to-Date Funeral Parlors

M. E. Silva’s Embalming Room is the best; in fact, the only one of its kind in this city and county with modern ideas pertaining to the care of the dead.

M. E. Silva’s Res. Undertaking Parlors

24 CHAPLAIN LANE, OPP. CATHOLIC SISTERS

Phone 179—Night 1014

(Evening Bulletin, 7/2/1910, p. 16)

THE RESIDENCE UNDERTAKING PARLOR...

Evening Bulletin, Established 1882, Number 4660, Page 16. July 2, 1910.