About nupepa

Just another place that posts random articles from the Hawaiian-Language Newspapers! It would be awesome if this should become a space where open discussions happen on all topics written about in those papers!! And please note that these are definitely not polished translations, but are just drafts!!! [This blog is not affiliated with any organization and receives no funding. Statements made here should in now way be seen as a reflection on other organizations or people. All errors in interpretation are my own.]

Response to the Mormon farming on Lanai article, 1862.

The Mormon activity on Lanai.

O Kuokoa Newspaper, Aloha oe:—

In the last Issue of the Kuokoa of the 22nd of March, in the section called “Na mea hou o Hawaii nei,” it was explained there what was found and what was done by the Mormons of Lanai, pertaining to the pulling of the Plow in their work; Continue reading

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Mormons farming on Lanai? 1862.

[Found under: “NA MEA HOU O HAWAII NEI.”]

We received word that the Mormons living on Lanai are being made to work, pulling Plow [O-o Palau]. There are ten men who pull the  Plow, and if they do not put effort into  their pulling, Continue reading

News from Lanai, 1918.

NEWS FROM THE LAND OF TRICKSTERS OF KAULULAAU, LANAI.

Mr. Solomon Hanohano:—On the night of the 4th of December, there landed a skiff of castaways at Kanaele; five haole and four Chinese.

Their ship left San Francisco filled with goods for Manila, and this steamship encountered a storm and the water came in the cargo doors; there was nothing they could do, and the captain and his sailors and the engineers waited until the ship sank and they got on the skiffs. Continue reading

Did you get to see, “Day of Conquest: A Story of Kaululāʻau,” put on by Lānaʻi Academy of Performing Arts?

THE STORY
OF
ELEIO.

PART 1.

IT IS PERHAPS WELL THAT WE TALK here about Eleio, the caretaker of Kakaalaneo, one of the Alii of Maui, and thereafter, talk about Kaululaau, the actual son of Kakaalaneo and Kelekeleiokaula, an female alii of Hawaii, the daughter of Kaleihaohia, an alii of Hawaii. Continue reading

Registered to vote. 1919.

HAWAIIANS WERE THE GREATEST NUMBER TO REGISTER.

Amongst the different ethnicities to register in the registration book of those eligible to vote, in the office of Clerk Kalauokalani, Hawaiians were the greatest number, although this is but a small fraction of the total number of Hawaiians.

In accordance with the new law, everyone who is eligible to vote is required to register again this year, to make clear those who have died and who have moved to other islands outside of Oahu. Continue reading