About nupepa

Just another place that posts random articles from the Hawaiian-Language Newspapers! It would be awesome if this should become a space where open discussions happen on all topics written about in those papers!! And please note that these are definitely not polished translations, but are just drafts!!! [This blog is not affiliated with any organization and receives no funding. Statements made here should in now way be seen as a reflection on other organizations or people. All errors in interpretation are my own.]

Sharks at Hoopuloa, 1926.

MANY SHARKS AT HOOPULOA

A traveller to Hoopuloa reported that the shores near Hoopuloa were full of Sharks. There was a submarine [moku luu] that arrived at that place mentioned, and those on board the submarine spoke of the great number of sharks at this place, Continue reading

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Kapu aloha, 2019.

What do you think of this new idea, kapu aloha?

Do you think it is a good thing?

Do you think it is working?

Are you abiding by it?

Are your family and friends abiding by it?

Who do you think is enforcing/should enforce it?

 

 

 

George Berkely Rowell, 1865.

News from Waimea, Kauai.

In the midday of this 9th of August, G. B. Rowell and the church members who followed him went into the Church of Waimea with new locks to shut the doors of the Church so that it could not be entered with the old keys in our possession, until our meeting hour, at 1:30, when I went to ring our meeting bell; the doors were locked and people were on guard from inside, with the doors locked; and I said, “open the doors you guys so that I can come in to ring our bell.” Kahele and Luka, the heads of Rowell’s church refused. Continue reading

Hawaiian sailors, victims of the Shenandoah, 1865.

Alas for the Hawaiian Sailors.

This past Thursday, a Whaling Ship came in, with some men from the ships that were captured by the ship Shenandoah [Kenadoa]. It brought the victims of the ships which were burned. They were 52 in total, and four of them were taken to the Hospital. These are their names: Continue reading

On neutrality, 1865.

Hawaiian Neutrality.

Our “Query” of last week has received a response from one of the Government organs, a reply however by no means satisfactory.

The fling is entirely amiss, that we are not acting the part of Hawaiians, but of Americans, in speaking of this nation as weak, and its acts as having no great effect abroad.It is because we love Hawaii, weak as she is, that wewould have her for her own sake avoid following the bad example of other nations, and would also have her prompt in following their good examples. Continue reading

The newspapers may not always report “the truth,” but they are a priceless source for historical information, 1864, Today, and Tomorrow.

Newspapers!

nupepa

The newspapers are someplace we should be looking at for other ways to look at Hawaiian history.

Newspapers, unlike books were relatively easy to come by (whether it was by subscription, or by sharing with a neighbor).

Most people could not afford to publish books, but many people had the means to purchase pen and paper and envelope and stamp, so that they could send in their thoughts to be printed. And many in fact did. They wanted the truth as they knew it to be known by all. And because newspapers were printed regularly, it was easy to immediately comment on errors appearing in the pages of the paper. There are often heated debates over everything and anything from genealogy, to mele, to why you should not lend money to that man or woman who left a marriage bed. These debates not only took place in a single newspaper…

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