About nupepa

Just another place that posts random articles from the Hawaiian-Language Newspapers! It would be awesome if this should become a space where open discussions happen on all topics written about in those papers!! And please note that these are definitely not polished translations, but are just drafts!!! [This blog is not affiliated with any organization and receives no funding. Statements made here should in now way be seen as a reflection on other organizations or people. All errors in interpretation are my own.]

Day honoring Kamehameha Paiea, 1892.

KAMEHAMEHA DAY

This 11th day of June is one of the important days for Hawaiians, cherished and greatly displayed amongst the holidays of the land. This day was established by Kamehameha V as a day of remembrance for his royal kupuna Kamehameha I, the conqueror of the nation who unified all of the islands to be governed under one alii. Continue reading

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Why do we ignore science? 1983.

Volcano alarm sounded, but nobody listened

Clark’s Big Isle

“You may bring a horse to the river, but he will drink when and what he pleaseth.”

—George Herbert, 1640.

HILO.—In early 1975, Drs. Donald Peterson and Donald Mullineaux, volcanologists, issued a report, “Volcanic Hazards on the Island of Hawaii.” If reaction had come in a theater, the audience would have booed.

Peterson was scoffed at by Big Island real estate agents and tourist industry leaders. Mayor Herbert Matayoshi jumped on the bandwagon and castigated the scientists for unduly alarming residents, potential visitors and prospective investors.

As a result, the report was largely ignored. Continue reading

Experiment of Japanese laborers, 1868.

NOTES OF THE WEEK.

Arrival of Japanese Emigrants.—The British ship Scioto, Captain Reagan, arrived yesterday, 33 days from Yokohama, Japan, with the first instalment of Japanese laborers, selected and shipped to the Hawaiian Government by its Consul Mr. Van Reed. These laborers are in charge of Dr. D. J. Lee and Mr. A. D. Baum, who have taken special care to preserve the health of the passengers, and they have arrived in excellent condition. Continue reading

More news about the gannenmono, 1868.

The Yaconin [Yakunin].—The Board of Immigration have placed Saburo [Tomisaburo Makino], (the Japanese official who came with the laborers in the Scioto), at school at Punahou. It was a condition imposed by the Tycoon [? shogun], in the permission given to our Consul, Mr. Van Reed, to send the Japanese to these Islands, that a Yaconin should accompany them, and remain until the expiration of their contracts. Saburo, therefore, while clothed by his own Government with a responsibility to look after his countrymen, during their voyage hither, and residence here, now that the laborers are distributed to their various places for work, and the call for his services in the management is infrequent, desires to improve his time in the study of the language and the books of the foreigners among whom his lot is cast for three years. We shall have in Saburo an opportunity to send back to Japan an educated man, acquainted with our ways, customs and country, and hereafter to be of service, we hope, in our father relations with Japan. Continue reading

Japanese laborers, 1868.

Japanese.—Dispatches from Consul Van Reed inform us, that he has engaged and will ship for Honolulu 180 picked Japanese for laborers. Their contracts are for three years are $4.00 per month, found and medical attendance, to be taken to Honolulu and returned at end of contract, free of expense. Continue reading

Clarice Taylor talks of Kilauea place names, 1959.

Clarice B. Taylor’s
Tales about Hawaii

Place Names About Kilauea Crater

Another attempt to destroy Pele and her volcanic fires crops up in a little known legend which comes from the Island of Kauai.

After the death of the Chief Kaha-wali in a lava flow at Puna, Hawaii, the Kauai chiefs determined to make an end to Pele and her antics.

Kauai in those days was famous for having Kahunas (priests) of great spiritual powers. The people of Kauai believed they were strong enough to cope with Pele. So six priests were selected and sent to Hawaii with instructions to go to Kilauea and surround Pele. Continue reading

Holua race between Kahawali and Pele, 1930.

THE WOMAN OF THE CRATER.

One day when Pele was in her crater home, she heard a racket. She took upon the usual attire of women and stood atop a hill to look, and she saw an alii sledding on his holua down a cliff, and when he reached the bottom of the cliff, the people cheered.

When that alii reached the place where Pele stood on top of the cliff, he said I challenge you to sledding.

Kahawali turned and said, “Come.” Continue reading