Lindsay/Lindsey genealogy found in a death announcement, 1912.

MY BELOVED HUSBAND, MR. THOMAS WESTON LINDSAY, HAS PASSED ON

O Kuokoa Newspaper, Aloha oe:—Please include this parcel of sadness and grief in an empty space of your columns so that my multitudes will know my dear husband has passed, Mr. Thomas Weston Lindsay. Aloha no!

To all my dear family, friends, and intimates, residing from Hawaii to Niihau, from this column you will learn that my beloved kane, Mr. Thomas Weston Lindsay has gone, he left me and all of my family grieving for him with pain, and my heart filled with love for him.

My beloved kane, Mr. Thomas Weston Lindsay, was born here in Waimea, in the Kipuupuu rain, from the loins of Mary and George Kynaston Lindsay, on the 16th of June, 1854, therefore he spent a full 58 years, five months, and 29 days breathing in the sweet air of this life.

There were many of them begotten from the loins of their parents; some of them have gone along with my beloved husband who has gone, leaving one sister and several brothers [hoahanau], their names being, Mrs. Elizabeth Chillingworth; Mr. James Fay Lindsay; Willie Lindsay in Honolulu; Edwin Lindsay in Puunene, Maui; Mr. Charles Robert Lindsay in Lahaina, Maui; this is all of his siblings that are living and breathing the sweet air of this worldly life.

There were many children begotten from the loins of my dearly beloved husband, Mr. Thomas Weston Lindsay and his first wife, Mrs. Betsey Lindsay; two children have gone earlier on the same path which their father has gone one, and seven are living; their names are, Mr. William Miller Symor Lindsay; Mr. Charles Kahiliaulani Lindsay; Mr. Thomas Weston Lindsay, Jr.; Master Samuel Frederick Leslie Lindsay; Miss Elizabeth Rosy Lindsay; Miss Christina Pomelia Lindsay; Mrs. Mary Mainaaupo; this is all of his children who are living, with ten grandchildren. Aloha no!

The two of us were joined in the bonds of holy covenant of marriage by Rev. S. W. Kekuewa at the loving home of of my parents, Mr. and Mrs. Kaimana, at Honomakau, North Kona, Hawaii, in the month of January 23, 1904. We lived together with aloha a full eight years and more when he left me, the children, the grandchildren and all of the family, feeling sadness and endless regret for my dearly beloved man. My dear husband was a local, a native, and a familiar to Waimea nei, in the Kipuupuu rain, the Malama Eelekoa [Malana Eelekoa] rain, the Kapaahoa rain, and the Paliloa rain.

He was welcoming, he gave recognition to those up high and those below; auwe my never ending regret for my dear husband! The doctors tried very hard for the benefit of my dearly beloved kane, but to no avail. My dear husband grew weary of this life at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Elizabeth Chillingworth, at Honolulu at one o’clock in the night of December 5, 1912; from there he was taken to the undertaker of H. H. Williams, and he remained there until I returned the remains of my dearly beloved man, along with the children and grandchildren. How regretful!

We arrived at the whispering seas of Kawaihae where the Eka winds blew against my cheeks. Auwe, the pain and fluttering of my heart for my dearly beloved who lies motionless at that place where we were together, the many ravines spread out! Auwe my dear kane! We arrived at our home, the home in which I was together with my dear man, the children, the grandchildren, and the family; auwe, how dejected to look upon, to think about, when I remember all of the good things he did for me!

Aloha, Kipuupuu rain of Waimea nei, the rain which I lived as a kamaaina with my dear kane; you will no more prick his cheeks with your wind-blown spray; O famed beautiful mountains of the land, O Mauna Kea, and Mauna Loa, those beautiful mountains that my dear man faced in the cold, no more will your chilly mists touch upon him. Aloha wale!

The two of us were together until we reached the place of my birth, in the Apaapaa wind of Kohala; and from there to the peaceful seas of Kona with its billowing clouds in the calm, all the way until the sacred cliff of Keoua; those were the places I was with my dearly beloved kane who left me; from there all the way to the beauty of the town in the Kanilehua rain of Hilo; all of these places I was with my dear kane aloha. Auwe, the pain in my naau!

Aloha to the standing cliffs of Hilo which the two of was walked, aloha to the wind of that unfamiliar land, and the rivers of Hilo, you will no more wet with your spray my dear husband, my dear companion in the forest of Panaewa and the pahoehoe of Olaa. O fragrance carrying wind of the pit, you will no more touch upon my dearly beloved kane. Auwe, my endless regret for my dear kane! I will never forget all of the kind things he did for me. He has gone, he is no more, his voice will not be heard again, no more also is all of his deeds; like what the Great Book says: Dust to dust, and the spirit to the one who created it. Praised be His name in the high heavens; peace on earth, aloha to all children of man. Blessed be His name. Amen.

With appreciation to the Kuokoa newspaper.

In sadness,

MRS. FANNY E. K. LINDSAY.

Waimea, S. Kohala, Dec. 20, 1912.

[The newspapers, Hawaiian and English as well, are a good place to look for genealogy. Back in the day, the spellings of names were not so rigid as it is today. Try as many variants as you can think of.]

(Kuokoa, 12/27/1912, p. 6)

Kuokoa_12_27_1912_6.png

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLVIII, Helu 52, Aoao 6. Dekemaba 27, 1912.

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