Ah, it is “limitations in displaying the Hawaiian diacritical markings accurately on various computer operating systems,” 2018.

Due to limitations in displaying the Hawaiian diacritical markings accurately on various computer operating systems and to ensure integrity of the information, the okina and kahako used in Hawaiian words have been excluded from all copy that appears on this website.

However, in all printed materials, HVCB recognizes the proper spelling of Hawaiian words and names including the use of the okina (‘) and the kahako (line over the vowel).

Please click here to download a detailed explanation (in PDF format) on the use of the Hawaiian language, its alphabet, and proper usage.

[It is interesting that this is still a thing in 2018. Also, I looked, but could not find a downloadable pdf of an explanation on the use of the Hawaiian language.]

(http://media.gohawaii.com/statewide/hawaii-information/hawaiian-language/)

HVCB.png

Advertisements

3 thoughts on “Ah, it is “limitations in displaying the Hawaiian diacritical markings accurately on various computer operating systems,” 2018.

  1. It is a mixed bag of explaining Hawaiian language to travel writers and those trying to fill in paperwork for grants. Most of the material is at least a decade old and the font packages are probably 20 years old and out of date. In 2018, you can purchase a limited number fonts that have a wide range of symbols for web use. Through the symbols you can insert the perfect diacritical marks for many languages. Trouble is there is a lot of extra work in typesetting them in.

    • In this day and age, you can use applications to create shortcuts to help insert code for web pages or simply insert Hawaiian words and place names into your autocorrect dictionary in Word (and other word processing applications). However, the bigger issue is 1) does it really display correctly (seems to) and 2) what is the correct symbol for the ʻokina? While Mac users brag about the Hawaiian keyboard that’s built into their OS, the encoded Unicode is &#x2018 (Left Single Quotation Mark) but I’ve seen the ʻokina defined as &#x02bb (Modified Letter Turned Comma”. Which is correct? And, do we accept the old standard of “substitutes”?

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s