More on painting by Hitchcock at Hilo Library, 1926.

PAINTING BY LOCAL ARTIST TO HANG IN HILO LIBRARY

D. HOWARD HITCHCOCK OFFERS PICTURE OF ISLAND SCENE TO PUBLIC HERE

D. Howard Hitchcock, Hawaii’s own master artist, has signified a desire to have his work with the brush and pallete represented publicly in his native city of Hilo, and has offered one of his paintings to the Hilo Public Library, where the picture is now on exhibition for a few weeks, pending the pleasure of the directors in accepting it.

The painting represents Mauna Kea glowing with high color from the setting sun, as seen from the Waimea plains, while the foreground lies in the cool tones of the gathering dusk.

Impressive Notes Seen

The high note in the picture, at least as seen by one disinterested critic, is the great impressiveness with which it binds Hawaii to the rest of the world, in certain sections and altitudse. The sentiment of the picture seems to be one of substantiability of the imposing mountain mas sand that all of the island country is not of the jungle and sweltering…

(Continued on page 8)

HiloTribuneHerald_11_27_1926_1

Hilo Tribune Herald, Volume IV, Number 279, Page 1. November 27, 1929.

…lowland type such as popular imagination generally depicts the islands.

As a work of art, the painting carries a wonderful atmosphere and feeling, with a sense of coolness and repose. Under a scant snow cap and the reflected glow, old Mauna Kea seems to stand like a veteran of the ages—impressive, majestic, and its dignified monarch of mountains.

Picture Described

In the foreground are clumps of eucalyptus and other trees, and then the broad plains stretching away to the distant mountain. The border between light and shadow lies where the steep slope of the mountain begins, making the picture a two-tone contrast excellently handled.

[Does anyone know where this painting lives today?]

(Hilo Tribune Herald, 11/27/1926, p. 8)

HiloTribuneHerald_11_27_1926_8

Hilo Tribune Herald, Volume IV, Number 279, Page 8. November 27, 1929.

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