Now this is one huge hapuupuu (sea bass)! 1917.

GRANDFATHER OF A HAPUUPUU FISH WAS CAUGHT, 750 POUNDS IN WEIGHT.

This Monday, a Japanese went out fishing on his 33 feet boat. When he was outside of Makua, close by Waianae, while he was letting out his line to fish, and as he pulled, it was as if his hook was stuck, and this Japanese didn’t think that he had hooked a huge fish, but he figured it out when the fish began to drag him and his tiny boat. The fish was left to do as it pleased, being that he realized that he would not be able to pull in this huge fish because it was too strong to pull in the water. He followed after the fish for a long period of time, and when the Japanese saw that the fish had grown weak, that was when he pulled it to the side of his boat and returned to Honolulu nei.

When this fish reached the fish market, it was auctioned off and was sold to the Chinese with a $100 cash.

After going to the Chinese, it was immediately cut up into small pieces at 50¢ a pound, and at that price, the money got by the Chinese through retail sale was $265; the gross sale [?] was about $365; and so the Chinese who sold the fish profited about $265.

They say that everything was sold, nothing was left. In the fishing profession, Japanese make a lot of money, when it was work done by Hawaiians in years past; these days, the work has gone to these people. These people are not better prepared at fishing than Hawaiians, but the problem lies in that Hawaiians neglect this money-making profession, and because of this, it moved into the hands of other people.

Look at the great profit this Japanese made in one day, so therefore, O Hawaiians, you must keep up so that you will be prepared in this profession from now on, and that goes for farming as well—that is the only road to living comfortably and independently.

[The current “Hawaii State Record” seems to be recorded as 563 pounds. Take a look at Hawaii Fishing News.]

(Aloha Aina, 1/27/1917, p. 4)

PAA KE KUPUNA O NA IʻA HAPUUPUU, HE 750 PAONA KE KAUMAHA.

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke XXII, Helu 4, Aoao 4. Ianuari 27, 1917.

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