Hula program by Iolani Luahine, “beginning of a renaissance”.

Iolani Luahine Recreates Poetry Of Old Hawaii in Hula Recital

Iolani Luahine, premier exponent of the ancient hula, was presented to a capacity of audience at Mabel Smyth auditorium Tuesday night in  a program which might well prove to be the beginning of a renaissance for the rhythmic interpretative dances of the early Hawaiians.

The program will be repeated tonight.

#     #     #

The large audience was deeply impressed and fascinated by the charm, subtlety, variety and ever changing color and mood of the dances.

#     #     #

Atmosphere of the primitive in the Hawaiian people was greatly enhanced by the capable manipulation of the drum, gourd, conch-shell and other simple stage effects.

In this Lokalia Montgomery continuously supporter the soloist, and revealed an artistry worthy of the best exponents of these effects.

Kawena Pukui was the excellent narrator.

#     #     #

With refreshing tranquility and easy motions a bevy of comely young Hawaiian maidens (wahines to be exact) performed several group numbers in perfect unison, softly intoning appropriate chants and meles.

#     #     #

Miss Luahine has discovered no new art form, but like all true interpreters of primitive dances she adheres closely to the “word” and the movement as it has been passed down through her family for several generations.

#     #     #

Modern hula, as new presented generally for the delectation of the public, possesses altogether too much sunsual posturing for the liking of ancient hula votaries.

Thus Miss Luahine, with her authentic interpretations is being hailed as the one who may resuscitate the true hula form, recreate and elevate it to its proper place in the art life of the islands.

#     #     #

There is a minimum of sensuality in her dances and chant interpretations. Rather, she seeks to convey to her audience, through rhythmic body motions and continuous facial expression, poetic thought, serious and humorous situations, running water, movement of trees, and so forth, and achieves an almost unbelievable illusion, if the audience lets itself “go” and becomes properly attuned—”gets on the same wave length.”

#     #     #

Always Miss Luahine is telling a story, seldom dancing for the sheer beauty of motion, as is mostly true of the modern version.

#     #     #

It is hopped by some that Miss Luahine’s fine artistry, keen sense of responsibility in carrying on the traditions handed down to her and her desire to disseminate her conceptions, may create a school of hula which may be an inspiration for the best the islands have to offer.

The writer is not prudish enough to decry modern hula for the sensuality which seemingly has crept in, believes it would be an insult to the Hawaiian people to suggest that the sensuality be removed. For all dancing has this emotional release, whether we want to believe it or not.

#     #     #

Serious students and lovers of the Hawaiian people and their arts will no doubt foster Miss Luahine in her splendid recreation of the old and the authentic—GDO

#     #     #

PROGRAM

Chanting and Drumming

Lokalia Montgomery

Hula Pahu (four drum dances)

Iolani Luahine

Kalani Kamanomano (The Turtle God)

Kaulilua i Ke Anu Waialeale (Cold is Waialeale)

A Koolau Au Ike i Ka Ua (I saw the rain at Koolau)

Aua Ia

_______________

Four Sitting Hulas:

Hula Iliili (pebble dance), Waioli (a description of a locality on Kauai)

_______________

Group

Hula Kii (dance of the graven images)

Papa Hehi (treadle board dance)

Pa’i Umauma (chest slapping dance)

Iolani Luahine

Chanting (recitation in monotone)

Lokalia Montgomery

_______________

Intermission

_______________

Hula Kalaau (stick dance)

Group

Kona Kai Opua (a description of a beauty spot on Kauai

Hula Hoe (paddle dance)

Iolani Luahine

Hula Puili  (split bamboo dance)

Group

_______________

Malua Kiiwai Ke Aloha (my affection goes out to the Malua breeze)

Hula Olapa (three gourd dances)

Iolani Luahine

Hole Waimea (Waimea is chilled by the breath of winter)

Ia Oe e Ka La (description of King Kalakaua’s trip around the world)

He Ma’i No Kunuiakea (name chant for a chifess)

Hula Uliuli (feathered gourd dance)

Group

_______________

Wahine Holo Lio (the woman who rides)

Ku’i Molokai (sporting dance from Molokai)

Group

_______________

Chanter, Lokalia Montgomery

Narrator, Kawena Pukui

The Hula Group, Josephine Like, Kalani Hanakiahi, Abigail Johnson, Annie Kapukui, Hoakalei, Hoakalei Messer, Nani Chang

Under the management of Helen Kirby Saueressig

[Wow!]

(Star-Bulletin 9/24/1947, p 10.)

StarBulletin_9_24_1947_10.png

Honolulu Star-Bulletin, Volume LIV, Number 17166, Page 10. September 24, 1947.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s