More on Liliu’s 73rd birthday celebration, 1911.

BIRTHDAY OF LILIUOKALANI

Honolulu, Sept. 2—The commemoration of Queen Liliuokalani’s birthday was held today, and according to what the Queen said to some of her friends:

“This is my seventy-third birthday, and i am in good health; i have left behind the disturbing things of this world in which we live, and have surrounded myself with many friends.”

The Queen’s health is fine indeed, and in the morning, the Band of the County [? Royal Hawaiian Band] arrived to play while she dined on breakfast until 10 a. m. Several associations arrived to giver their congratulations to the Alii; and at 11 o’clock, the procession of haole friends to see the Alii began, and this perhaps is the grandest royal audiences of haole giving their congratulations to the Queen.

The Queen was attired in a beautiful garments fitting of her stature, and attended by the Princess Kalanianaole and Mrs. Irene Holloway and Mrs. C. P. Iaukea. The place where the Queen sat was surrounded by many different kahili, and it was her steward, the Honorable C. P. Iaukea who introduced the many strangers. The Alii, the Queen, met each one who came to visit her and she placed a kind smile upon her Royal visage. When the writer for the Hoku [this newspaper, Hoku o Hawaii] appeared before the Alii, she immediately asked, “How are the famous lehua of the land, the lehua of Hilo; are the famous blossoms of the land still beautiful?”

The Queen wore a white lehua [lehua puakea] lei from Hilo, and on her Royal countenance was happiness. On that morning of her birthday, she presented the water leaping land of Waikahalulu as a Park for the public, and it will be administered for the benefit of the people.

The Hoku o Hawaii prays for the long life of the beloved Queen of Hawaii, and although she has no throne upon to rule, hers is the throne of aloha within the hearts of her loving people. May the Queen live in God.

[Unfortunately the issues of Hoku o Hawaii from 1906 to the early part of 1917 (including this article) are not available online! The more people talk about the importance of the information in the Hawaiian-Language Newspapers and the need to rescan those newspapers clearly and make them accurately searchable, the more chance there will be funding for it!]

(Hoku o Hawaii, 9/7/1911, p. 2)

LA HANAU O LILIUOKALANI.

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Buke 6, Helu 18, Aoao 2. Sept. 7, 1911.

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