More from Duke Kahanamoku and the Olympics, 1912.

THE SWIMMING CHAMPION OF HAWAII IS HEARD FROM AGAIN.

KAHANAMOKU BREAKS HIS FASTEST RECORD IN GERMANY.

The news which had the town’s people in an uproar this past Monday was the news received by cable from Hamburg, Germany on that day, saying that Duke Kahanamoku could swim the distance of a hundred meters in a minute and a fifth of a second, which is the fastest time, not achieved by any other contender of the world.

Duke Kahanamoku holds the title of champion of the world for this distance of one hundred meters which he swam at Stockholm, Sweden, with a time of sixty-two and two-fifth seconds, but this record was broken by he himself, by two and one-fifth seconds, which has the people in town sure that he can swim this distance within sixty seconds, or a minute.

From that cable which arrived from Hamburg, Honolulu’s people can see that Kahanamoku is touring other lands before turning back to Hawaii.

This is the cable that was sent, telling of the joyful news to Hawaii’s people about Kahanamoku.

Hamburg, Germany. July 22—Today, Duke Kahanamoku, Jr. of Honolulu once again received the title of champion of the world in the 100 meter race held in the Olympic games. This is a new time for this distance, in a meet held here, in which many old-time athletes were invited. Kahanamoku swam the 100 meter race in one minute and a fifth of a second, which breaks his very own time of a minute two and two-fifth seconds which was gotten at Stockholm in a match for the championship.

(Kuokoa, 7/26/1912, p. 1)

LOHE HOU IS KA MOHO AU O HAWAII

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLVIII, Helu 30, Aoao 1. Iulai 26, 1912.

Olympics, Duke Kahanamoku and the King of Sweden, 1912.

THE KING OF SWEDEN AND DUKE KAHANAMOKU OF HAWAII.

July 10—The news spread around the world of the standing of the Hawaiian boy, Duke Kahanamoku. There were thousands gathered in the capital of Sweden, wanting to catch a glimpse of the hero of Hawaii.

Those days became one of joyfulness because Duke captured the title, champion of the world. Duke was taken by the Committee in the vicinity of where the main Committee was announcing the finishers and their times in which they swam.

Gathered there as well was the King, Queen, and the Heads of State of other Nations, when the winner was announced along with his time. The skies were filled with cheers. And it is said that the voices ringing out in the skies were like the roar of thunder. At this time, the hand of the King was seen waving to the Duke of Hawaii, as he was standing all alone as is the general case with the Hawaiian People, a humble Lahui; and so of this Hawaiian, who hesitated to go and meet with a famed King of the world, but the King kept waving him forth, but at this time, the King stood and said, “I am happy to meet you, the one who dwarfed the swimming records of the world. And then right there after, the King introduced Duke Kahanamoku to the Queen who sat near by who had smiles for the dark-faced [maka poniponi] boy of Hawaii, and he thanked them for this honor granted him, humbly and unpretentiously.

(Hoku o Hawaii, 9/18/1912, p. 2)

KA MOI O SUEDENA AME DUKE KAHANAMOKU O HAWAII

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Buke 7, Helu 7, Aoao 2. Iulai 18, 1912.

A benefit held for Duke Kahanamoku, 1911.

[Found under “Local News”]

A ball game was held last Sunday, and the profits from that contest was given to Duke Kahanamoku for the expenses of him going to America to compete in a swim meet against America’s famous haole swimmers. $227.60 was raised.

(Aloha Aina, 12/9/1911, p. 4)

Ua malamaia he hookuku kinipopo...

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke XVI, Helu 49, Aoao 4. Dekemaba 9, 1911.

Duke Kahanamoku and Hui Nalu in SF follow up, 1913.

[found under “NUHOU KULOKO”—Local News]

On the Wilhelmina of this past Wednesday [10/8/1913], Duke Kahanamoku and his teammates of the Hui Nalu left for San Francisco, for the competition with the other swimming contestants who will enter into the swimming contest which will be held in the second half of this month at that city.

(Kuokoa, 10/10/1913, p. 4)

Ma ka Wilhelmin o ka Poakolu...

Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LI, Helu 40, Aoao 4. Okatoba 10, 1913.

Duke Kahanamoku and Hui Nalu to San Francisco, 1913.

Not Enough Money to Send Kahanamoku

The swimmers of the Hui Nalu received and invitation from San Francisco to go to the Portola show to be held in San Francisco, and that they arrive one week prior to the when the event will be held, so that they have time to enjoy and practice ahead.

This invitation was received by the Promotion Committee on the eve of this past Thursday by way of wireless telegraph, requesting that the boys of the Hui Nalu board the steamship Ventura on the 3rd of October instead of them waiting until the 8th.

There are many boys of the Hui Nalu who want to fulfill this invitation, however, some of them must work, and it seems that there are only a few of them that might be able to oblige.

One big obstruction faced by Kahanamoku and his teammates in going, is the lack of funds in their account, and so the fund-raising committee wants to raise two-hundred dollars, which would be sufficient for the travel expenses for the Hawaii boys. The committee is determined to raise those funds before the 8th of October, and to put the Hawaii boys aboard the steamship Wilhelmina so that they will have a lot of time before the Portola Festival [Oct. 22–25, 1913] in San Francisco, on the 22nd of October.

(Kuokoa, 10/3/1913, p. 5)

LAWA OLE KE DALA E HOOUNA AI IA KAHANAMOKU

Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LI, Helu 39, Aoao 5. Okatoba 3, 1913.