Near tragedy caused by Kamehameha V’s deer, 1868.

[Found under: “LOCAL NEWS: Maui”]

Life saved from deer.—P. Kawelakawai of Kawela, Molokai wrote to us like this: On the 29th of April, I saw Kaukino, the one who barely survived. Here is the reason; one of the animals of our King, a deer set loose on his ranch, entered the sweet potato patch of at Kalamaula to eat the uala, and this man saw this and went to shoo it off; the animal rushed forward but he saw it coming, and it was but a few feet away and it caught him and thrust its antlers, whereupon he fell down, face thrown back. He was jabbed in the armpit, and the antler pierced through. His wife saw this happen and she brought him back to the houses and the man was very weak. We are relieved at the news following that letter that he has recovered.

[See earlier articles on the deer gifted to Kamehameha V. Deer imported from Japan in 1867. and Deer of Kamehameha V., 1867.]

(Kuokoa, 5/23/1868, p. 3)

Pakele ke ola i ke dia.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke VII, Helu 21, Aoao 3. Mei 23, 1868.

Deer of Kamehameha V., 1867.

The King’s Deer:—This last week, the King’s deer were taken aboard the ship Lock-nar-Garr [Lochnagar ?] to his stables. At midday on this past Saturday, when the King’s stableman opened a stall where the deer were kept to give them water, come to find out, they got out and ran here and there and jumped into the ocean. They were caught; but while they were being caught, its antler was broken, and someone skilled from town tended to its injury. When the schooner Kamaile sails, they will be taken to Molokai.

(Au Okoa, 12/26/1867, p. 2)

Na dia a ka Moi...

Ke Au Okoa, Buke III, Helu 36, Aoao 2. Dekemaba 26, 1867.

Deer imported from Japan in 1867

Seven Deer—The Hawaiian Consul in Japan sent to our Benevolent King Kapuaiwa, eight live deer, however one died at sea. These deer were given as a gift to our King. We hear that these deer will be shipped to Molokai and set free; perhaps they will increase should they all live healthily for a long time. We recall that some were taken to Parker Ranch in Waimea, but what became of those deer; maybe they are roaming the cold forests of that mountainous land [aina mauna], and maybe they gave birth to young and are multiplying and becoming abundant on that island.

(Kuokoa, 12/21/1867, p. 2)

He Mau Dia Ehiku

Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke VI, Helu 51, Aoao 2. Dekemaba 21, 1867.