Continuation of yesterday’s article on Waipio, Hawaii, 1877.

Upon that house foundation is where Hakau was killed by the men of Umi.

Pertaining to Pakaalana.—This is where was placed the sacred cord [aha kapu] of Liloa, that being Ahuula [Ahaula], and it was by this cord that the ancient alii were recognized by the cord falling, but if the person approaching before the cord was not an alii, it would not fall.

Stone Image [Kii Pohaku].—There is a tall rock standing at the corner of the enclosure, and within it is the stone image of Liloa, and it was beat by Kapiolani and she broke off the top of the stone, [?? a ua pakuiiae Kapiolani a haki iho o luna o ua pohaku la,] and beyond that lay the sacred platform of Liloa [ka paepae kapu o Liloa], which was made like stairs, Liloa’s was the second step above, where the sun rose, and the step below was his kahu’s; it was made like that so that the shadow of the kahu would not fall upon the alii.

Kahua Hale.—This is the foundation of the house that Liloa and the chiefs played konane, and this foundation is where Liloa found Umi playing konane, that is Kauleialoa.

Puuolea.—This is where the malihini chiefs went to rest, and if they wanted to have an audience with Liloa, they released a pig; if the pig went and lay before the kahuna of Liloa, then the alii would be called to go and see Liloa, but if the pig went and returned, then the alii was not allowed to go and see Liloa; it was understood that the alii was there to rob Liloa, and he was expelled immediately and if he loitered, he was put to death.

Papakonane.—Covered totally under sand is the konane board of Liloa, under coconut trees; if it was not buried in sand, the two of us would have dug it up with the kamaaina. Continue reading

Wahi pana of Waipio, Hawaii, 1877.

Travels in North Kona.

Our guide [W. A. Mio] asked him [unnamed person very familiar with the wahi pana of Waipio] to go with us and he agreed, and we moved on until we stood at the edge of the road beneath Koaekea, the road taken by Umi and his aikane, Piimaiwaa folks [that being Piimaiwaa and Omaokamau], and makai of there was the house foundation of Milu, that being Paoo; upon there is a rock with an indentation, where the liver of Milu was placed, taken by Kaalaeanuiahina and hidden there.

Also upon there is where the palate [kileo] of Kihapu was broken because it was dropped from the mouth of Puapualenalena, the dog who fetched that conch, and it sounded, which is when the gods atop Hokuwelowelo guarding it heard.

I will speak a little on that; Liloa had a awa patch in the uplands of Moomuku, and he was bewildered by the one who raided it, and after a constant watch, it was seen that it was a dog that was doing the stealing, and when the dog left with the awa, the men followed until they arrived at the residence of the keeper of the dog; the men returned to Liloa and told him they found the one who was stealing from his awa patch, that it was a dog and his keeper, in the mountains facing Waimea; that is when Liloa commanded his men to bring the awa thieves, and Liloa also ordered them to fetch them and bring them unharmed, and this order of the alii was carried out; the men arrived before the man and his dog, and they told him of words of the alii to come; the keeper of the dog agreed at once and he went and appeared before Liloa. Liloa asked, “Can your dog go and fetch the conch (Kihapu), because it is currently my great nemesis; and should it be gotten by your dog, then you and your dog will live;” however the keeper of the dog believed, as for Liloa’s words saying the two of them would die, that Liloa and his men would not be victorious over his dog, Puapualenalena.

However, the keeper of the dog agreed and commanded his dog that he was to fetch it, and when Puapualenalena was coming back with Kihapu, a side of the conch hit the brow of a cliff, and that is why it fell and sounded, the kileo was broken, and the gods heard; he hastened, he was gone, and the gods were left frustrated. If you all have a desire to see Kihapu, go to Aliiolani Hale [Hawaiian National Museum], and you can see it in the room of glorious things.

Directly below the road of Koaekea are the fishponds of Liloa, Lokoula and Laakea [Lalakea]; but Lokoula is covered up in sand, and upland of the ponds is the house site of Liloa.

[Check back for the continuation of this article.]

(Lahui Hawaii, 11/1/1877, p. 2)

LahuiHawaii_11_1_1877_2

Ka Lahui Hawaii, Buke III, Helu 44, Aoao 2. Novemaba 1, 1877.

Mrs. Akioka passes away, 1928.

A LOVING SENTIMENT FOR OUR MAMA, MRS. AKIOKA

Mr. Editor of Ka Hoku o Hawaii:

Aloha oe—

Please allow to include this sad parcel in some space in your newspaper to be published this week, in the issue of this new year. Our beloved mother left us, her children and family to grieve for her.

She was born in Canton, China, in 1857, in the month of April 23, and left her homeland when she was thirty-two years old and came to the Hawaiian Islands. She lived patiently with her husband in the beautiful valley of Waipio working under a poi company for several years. After this, her husband started his very own poi company. His capital was a single mule, some leased land, and a hired hand.

He did well for five years, and at that point, the two of them grew until the other poi companies dropped off. Today, it is one of the big poi factories of this beautiful valley supplying on the average 8,000 pounds of poi every week, feeding the workers of the ranches of Hawaii nei. Her husband (our father) died three years ago.

We are her children

Ernest Akioka

Edward Akioka

Herbert Akioka

(Hoku o Hawaii, 1/17/1928, p. 3)

HE MANAO ALOHA NO KO MAKOU MAMA MRS AKIOKA

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Buke XXI, Helu 33, Aoao 3. Ianuari 17, 1928.

Mr. Akioka, a Chinese taro farmer/poi maker, dies, 1922.

AKIOKA PASSES AWAY.

MR. AKIOKA (CHINESE)

Mr. Editor of the Kuokoa Newspaper, Aloha kaua:—Please kindly allow me an open space of your newspaper, for our loved one, our father has left us, his children and his wife; he has peacefully left for that realm we must all go to.

He had a swelling sickness, and the doctor was fetched, but he did not get any relief and died.

Our father was born in the “land of flowers,” China, on the 30th of November, 1851, and he left us on the 18th of May, 1922; he was over 71 years old. Continue reading