A wise man’s question from his mother as he was growing up… timeless.

“Is that the best you can do?”

Should we not be asking this of ourselves every once and again, if not on a daily basis?

(Mahalo to Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o for making me think.)

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Father’s pleads for his son’s release, 1913.

ASKED FOR HELP FROM THE COURT FOR HIS SON

A Crippled Puerto Rican Appeared Before the Judge to Have His Son Released.

Before the court of Judge Whitney last Tuesday, a crippled Puerto Rican appeared named Emilio Rodriques, and pleaded that his son detained in the reform school at Waialee be released so that his son could take care of him in his old age.

The request of that Puerto Rican was heard because his plight was obvious to see, that being both his legs were amputated and he could not go to work.

That Puerto Rican has a son of fifteen who is detained in the school of Waialee, and the well being of this father depends on his son being released.

The court was not previously aware of the plight of the father of that Puerto Rican child, not until the father appeared before the court with his crutches; he is in much difficulty necessitating the release of his child to help him.

That Puerto Rican father was in an accident on Hawaii when he was run over by a train and injured his legs; he was treated in Hilo and survived.

With the money he had saved, he purchased false legs for himself, and went to work to care for his son until he was of age, but due to the child misbehaving, he was caught and sent to the reform school for boys.

(See on Page Four.)

ASKED FOR HELP FROM THE COURT FOR HIS SON

(From page One.)

This crippled Puerto Rican for some time went to work for the livelihood of himself and his child, but his false legs became rotten so that he could not use them again, and it is his crutches that assist him with walking, while he hopes to have his son take care of him.

He received many letters from his child assuring the father that he would be a good boy when he was released, and when the letters were shown to the judge, he immediately decided that it was right to release that boy immediately.

This made the father happy, that he received assurance that his son would be released, and he awaits the return of his child from Waialee on this coming Saturday.

(Kuokoa, 2/7/1913, pp. 1 & 4.)

UWALO I KA AHA NO KANA KEIKI

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLIX, Helu 6, Aoao 1. Feberuari 7, 1913.

UWALO I KA AHA NO KANA KEIKI

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLIX, Helu 6, Aoao 4. Feberuari 7, 1913.