Ninipo Hoonipo Song in Australia, 1927.

AMUSEMENTS

THE HAWAIIAN TROUBADOURS. The soft lapping of Pacific breakers lazily breaking on Waikiki beach, moon light, soft breezes whispering through the palm trees, Hawaian maidens crooning a soft “Aloha,” a song of love, in which all the witchery of the tropical night comes stealing across the waters, are conveyed by Kaai’s Hawaian Troubadours, who again charmed a large audience last night at the National Theatre. Particularly effective was their singing of “Imi Au Oe,”¹ “Na Ke Aloha,” and “Ninipo,” In which the Troubadours greeted the dawn; “Ukulele Lady,” “Collegiate,” “Hawaian Blues.” of every known and unknown variety; as well as other items of past and present popularity. Not to be forgotten was Tuavivi, Greig’s “Persuasion” Hula, in which she revealed all the languid grace and symmetry of the dusky beauties of the south. The ensemble of the closing revue was another outstanding item of tropical colour and harmony. The season will terminate to-morrow night.

[Earlier, i posted Liliuokalani’s “Ninipo Hoonipo Song”, and strangely enough, i ran across this reference to it being sung all the way in Australia in 1928!]

¹”Imi Au Ia Oe”

(Examiner, 4/22/1927, p. 6)

AMUSEMENTS.

The Examiner, Volume LXXXV, Number 95, Page 6. April 22, 1927.

“Kaai’s Hawaiians” on TROVE, 1928.

KAAI’S HAWAIIANS.

Kaaiʻs Hawaiians, who will open at the Garden Theatre on March 3, have recently concluded a season of 120 nights in Sydney. They include the Moana Jazz Four, who were specially engaged at the Wembley Exhibition. The head of the company is Ernest Kaai, the composer of   “Aloha oe,” which is virtally the Hawaiiian national anthem. He has written and opera, which was successfully pro…

Miss Tuavivi Greig

…duced in London, and he has his own publishing house and an intsruments factory. The combination has been touring the world since 1906. There are nine men   and six women in the company, and there is every possibility that Queenie and   David Kaili, who are we know here, will join them for the Adelaide season. Tuavivi,   who is a member of the company, is a noted hula dancer.

[This comes from an Adelaide, South Australia newspaper, found on the National Library of Australia webside, TROVE. It seems unclear newspaper images is not something limited to Hawaii nei. However, at least the text on that site is correctable.]

(Advertiser, 2/23/1923, p. 11)

KAAI'S HAWAIIANS.

The Advertiser, Volume LXX, Number 21645, Page 11. February 23, 1928.

More Ernest Kaai—meeting a Hawaiian living in Australia, 1925.

That Hawaiian Wants to Come Back Here

Ernest Kaai Finds L. G. Kaainoa in Australia, and He Tells of His Desire to See Once Again His Land

This is a picture of L. G. Kaainoa and Ernest Kaai. Mr. Kaai found Kaainoa in Australia, and he wants the help from Hawaiians to provide him a means for him to once again tread upon the land of his birth. From the left, L. G. Kaainoa, Ernest Kaai.

L. G. Kaainoa has been away from Hawaii for 50 years now without his family’s knowledge, or knowing even if he has ohana left alive here; Ernest Kaai sent a letter to the Ahahui Mamakakaua [Sons and Daughters of Hawaiian Warriors] telling them of the desire of Kaainoa (who now lives in New South Wales, Australia), to return to his homeland were he to receive assistance from Hawaii’s people to pay his expenses for the return.

According to the explanation in the letter of Ernest Kaai, L. G. Kaainoa is now 72 years old, and being that he is very old, the government provides him a pension of 4 dollars a week.

Ernest Kaai says he found Kaainoa at a place called Murwillumbah. He left Hawaii nei in his youth and it is there that he lived until his old age.

He married a woman, but she died 12 years earlier. He is infirm and cannot do hard labor. But he is given benefits by the government of 4 dollars every week.

Kaainoa is well liked by the people there, and when he met with Ernest Kaai, he made clear his hope to return to his homeland, if not for any other reason, but for his desire to leave his bones in Hawaii nei.

He is still very good at Hawaiian, yet is somewhat clumsy, but he is most fluent in English.

According to Kaai in his letter, he was staying along with his fellow musicians at a place called Tweed Heads, where they were waiting for the arrival of a ship to take them to Murbah. When the ship arrived, and after they loaded their belongings aboard, it was then they saw Mr. Kaainoa. He came all the way to meet with Kaai folk, and to welcome him to his town where he has lived for 50 years.

At their meeting, Kaainoa gave his hand, saying, “Aloha, aloha, aloha!” His heart was full while he expressed his great aloha as his tears flowed, while some others joined in with him.

After those feelings of aloha calmed within him, and his crying stopped, it was then that he began to speak, asking about some people in Hawaii nei. And as Kaai did not know them, he told him so. All he could think of that Kaainoa could ask of was the alii of Hawaii nei.

Kaai and his musical group spent two nights at Murbah, and on those two nights, they saw Kaainoa sitting way up front of the theater house. And when the singing was over, he continued to stomp on the floor as if he was so proud of this singing of his very own people.

The main reason Mr. Kaai wrote to the Ahahui Mamakakaua by way of Mrs. A. P. Taylor, the president of the Association, was to look for assistance; if she could ask the other Hawaiian associations to join in on this charitable endeavor to bring Kaainoa back to Hawaii nei for him to leave his bones in the soil of his homeland.

To follow through on this plea, Mrs. Taylor met with the president of the Hawaiian Civic Club [Kalapu Hoeueu Hawaii], and the secretary of the Kaahumanu Society; and in the upcoming days, the other Hawaiian organizations will learn about this assistance of their fellow Hawaiian.

(Kuokoa 3/5/1925, p. 1)

Makemake ia Hawaii e Hoi mai no ka Aina Nei

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LXIV, Helu 10, Aoao 1. Maraki 5, 1925.

More music—Ernest Kaai, 1906.

ERNEST KAAI LEFT ON HIS MUSICAL TOUR OF KAUAI.

Last evening, Professor Ernest Kaai of the town of Honolulu nei left for the island of Kauai along with his fellow musicians to hold concerts in the places where they will visit, and they will not be left without being welcomed by the people of Kauai.

Travelling along with him are Mrs. Nane [Nani] Alapai, the singer of the Royal Hawaiian Band; Miss Keala; Mr. Holokahiki; and John Noble, Jr., a youth skilled on the flute [hoopiopio?]. They number five in total, and they are members of that band that is moving quickly through the places they visit.

After arriving on Kauai, Lihue is the first port where they stop, and it is there that they will hold their first concert tomorrow. After that, their tour will go all the way to Koloa where they will have a concert on the coming Monday, the 6th.

Then their musical tour will move on to Eleele, where they will have a musical assembly on the next Tuesday, the 7th. From there they will arrive at Waimea, and they will open another concert on Tuesday [Wednesday] the 8th. And then onto Makaweli where they will have another concert on the next day, the 9th.

Ernest Kaai and his band mates will spend a number of days on Kauai, and when they reach Makaweli, and hold a concert there on the day shown, it is then that they will know where their tour will move to next.

On this tour, Professor Kaai has time to give benefit concerts for good causes if it will be beneficial, but this all depends on the scheduling.

Mr. Kaai is a young Hawaiian that is well known in this town among the Hawaiians and among the haole that love playing music, for the regular job of that young man is teaching music. There are many haole women and haole men and Hawaiians as well who were taught by him and graduated in music.

[If this post looks familiar to some of you, it is because I posted it some time ago on the old Hoolaupai Facebook page. I found that it is not easy to find anything on that page, so started the blog at http://nupepa-hawaii.com, where it is a whole lot easier to find posts! So I will be on occasion reposting articles so that they will be findable in one location. They will all be under the category “Repost”.]

(Kuokoa, 8/3/1906, p. 8)

UA HALA AKU O ERNEST KAAI I KE KAAHELE HIMENI NO KAUAI.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLV, Helu 31, Aoao 8. Augate 3, 1906.

Sheet music of famous songs being sung by Ernest Kaai, 1912.

SOME FAMOUS HAWAIIAN SONGS.

Everyone wanting copies of the famous songs being sung by the group of Ernest Kaai, they being “Uina Loko” and “Sweet Sweeting,” write to Kalani Peters, Number 168, Beritania Street. These are mele set with musical notes so that those who read music can sing them without confusion. They are 25 cents per copy. Send in your orders and money.

[I have not found a copy of this compilation as of yet… But i bet someone has a copy in their grandma’s piano bench, the kind with the lift-up music storage compartment!]

(Aloha Aina, 2/24/1912, p. 4)

HE MAU MELE HAWAII KAULANA.

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke XVI, Helu 8, Aoao 4. Feberuari 24, 1912.