Keaukaha lauhala house, 1936.

LAUHALA HOUSE TO BE TURNED OVER TO HOMES COMMISSION

The lauhala house planned at Keaukaha park under the supervision of the Kuhio Improvements club will be turned over to the Hawaiian Homes Commission, it was announced Saturday by James Puuohau, secretary of the club. The board of supervisors has approved of the plan of having the homes commission take charge of the construction of the unique house.

At the suggestion of Princess Abigail Kawananakoa, a member of the commission, the club is planning to establish a clinic building at Keaukaha together with the cooperation of the commission. This building will serve as a health center and baby clinic for the entire Hawaiian community at Keaukaha.

(Hoku o Hawaii, 11/25/1936, p. 1)

LAUHALA HOUSE TO BE TURNED OVER TO HOMES COMMISSION

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Volume XXXI, Number 30, Aoao 1. November 25, 1936.

The pioneers of the Hawaiian Homes Lands in Kalamaula, Molokai, 1922.

Eight Ohana will Head First to the Homestead Lands at Molokai

The Hawaiian Homes Commission Chose those People who were Thought to be Appropriate for Going First to the Lands of Kalamaula, Molokai

Amongst the applicants that reached seventy in number, to go back to the homestead lands of Molokai, the Commissioner of Hawaiian Homes chose  last week Wednesday, eight families as the first to go to live on the homestead lands of Kalamaula Kai, and the rest, they will go later, however, only between twenty and twenty-four families total will live at Kalamaula.

In the selection of the commission of those eight families, it was done with them choosing full-blooded Hawaiians, hapa Haole, and hapa Chinese. At the same time, considered were their ages and the children in their families.

The first eight Hawaiians and their families which were selected by the commission to go to the aina hoopulapula at Kalamaula Kai are here named below:

David K. Kamai, a full-blooded Hawaiian who is 41 years old, his occupation is a contractor and a carpenter. He has a wife and they have 11 children, 6 boys and 5 girls. He is a land owner and he has knowledge of taro cultivation, sweet potato, corn, cabbage, alfalfa grass and melons. He is prepared to go at once and live on the land when his application is approved.

Clarence K. Kinney, of Honolulu nei, is a hapa Haole, and is 42 years old. His occupation is an ukulele maker and a maker of umeke. He is married, and they have 7 children, 3 boys and 4 girls. He is a land owner. He was born on farm lands, with knowledge of dry land taro cultivation, sweet potato planting, corn, melon and other crops. He is ready to go to the aina hoopulapula in thirty days after his application is approved.

Albert Kahinu, Kaunakakai, Molokai. He is a hapa Hawaii that is 28 years old. He is employed by the Hawaiian Homes Commission on Molokai as a water pump engineer. He is married and they have one son. He knows how to raise chicken and pig, and how to plant sweet potato, banana, melon, and other crops. His wife is also knowledgeable in that kind of work. He does not own property, but is prepared to go at once to live on the homestead lands.

W. A. Aki, Honolulu, is a Hapa Chinese, and is 28 years old; he is an overseer of laborers. He is married and they have two children, a son and daughter. He is knowledgeable about planting crops to assist his family. His wife has been a school teacher for eight years at the Girls’ Correctional School at Kamoiliili. They are ready to go live on the aina hoopulapula.

John Puaa, Kaunakakai, Molokai, is a full-blooded Hawaiian, and is 52 years old; he is employed by the commission at Molokai. He is married, and they have 10 children, 5 boys and 5 girls. He has lived with his wife on a ranch for 25 years, and the two are knowledgeable at various work. They are prepared to go live on homestead lands without delay.

Harry Apo, Lahaina, Maui, is a hapa Chinese, and he works as a letter carrier. He is married, and they have 6 children, 4 girls and 2 boys. He lived at Lahainaluna School for two years, and four years at Kamehameha School, learning farming at Kamehameha. He is ready to move to the aina hoopulapula in July or August perhaps.

George W. Maioho, Kihei, is a hapa Chinese, and is 40 years old. He is married, and they have four children, 2 girls and 2 boys. He is capable of all sorts of work, from planting crops to raising livestock. He will go at once after his application is approved to live on the aina hoopulapula with his family.

William Kamakaua, Kawela, Molokai, is a full-blooded Hawaiian, and is 38 years old; he is employed by the commission on Molokai. He is married with 10 children, 5 sons and 5 daughters. He worked along with his wife on Molokai Ranch for 17 years. He is prepared to live on the homestead lands.

Of these eight families, only three will go first, because only three of the lots have been so far cleared by the commission to be farmed at once, and thereafter, other families will go when their lots are ready.

[There was a nice article in this month’s Ka Wai Ola, on page 5, about a remembrance of the first settlers of the Hawaiian Homes lands at Kalamaula. Here are more families that were chosen, listed in the Kuokoa on 8/17/1922.

Here is perhaps a more detailed article on the eight found in the Kuokoa on 7/6/1922, p. 2.]

(Kuokoa, 7/6/1922, p. 1)

Ewalu Ohana e Hoi e Ana no na Aina Hoopulapula ma Molokai

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LXI, Helu 27, Aoao 1. Iulai 6, 1922.