Let Hawaiian be taught in the schools, 1939.

Something that Should be Done

Senator James Kealoha of Hawaii introduced a law into the Legislature to teach Hawaiian language in the government schools, and in schools that stand on land under the care of the Hawaiian Homes Commission [Komisina o na Home Hawaii].

The senator believes that by teaching children Hawaiian in the places shown above, for only Hawaiians live on Hawaiian Homes land, and it is right to teach them the mother tongue. This idea of the young senator is a fine one indeed. But in the mind of some people they do not believe that this is a very good bill to be supported by the other members of the senate as well as the house of representatives.

Thoughts expressed by some who are not Hawaiian is that this bill should be amended to whereby it is opened up widely and Hawaiian is taught at all government schools in the Archipelago.

If this young senator did not submit this bill, the thoughts of others would not have been known. Continue reading

An adornment for Prince Kuhio by Mrs. Annie Freitas, 1922.

HE WEHI ALOHA NO KALANIANAOLE.

He inoa nou e Kalanianaole,
Ka onohi momi a o Hawaii nei.

He mea nui oe na ka lahui,
Milimili na ka Ua Kukalahale.

Ua ku’i e ka lono puni na moku,
O Kalanianaole ua hele loa.

Aia paha oe i Amerika,
I ka uluwehi a o Wakinekona.

Ua kohoia oe e ka lahui,
I wahaolelo no Hawaii.

Kakooia e ka ili keokeo,
Repubalika kou baloka. Continue reading

Praise for Prince Kuhio and Hawaiian Homesteads by Phillip Luahiwa, 1926.

HE INOA NO KALANIANAOLE

1 He inoa nou e Kalanianaole
He hiwahiwa oe o ka lahui.

2 Eia makou ou mau kini
I ka aina hoopulapula.

3 Ua imi oe i ka pono me [ke] ahonui
I pono au mau kini.

4 E ola mau na kini opio ou e Kalani
Mai na lani kiekie loa mai. Continue reading

The pioneers of the Hawaiian Homes Lands in Kalamaula, Molokai, 1922.

Eight Ohana will Head First to the Homestead Lands at Molokai

The Hawaiian Homes Commission Chose those People who were Thought to be Appropriate for Going First to the Lands of Kalamaula, Molokai

Amongst the applicants that reached seventy in number, to go back to the homestead lands of Molokai, the Commissioner of Hawaiian Homes choseĀ  last week Wednesday, eight families as the first to go to live on the homestead lands of Kalamaula Kai, and the rest, they will go later, however, only between twenty and twenty-four families total will live at Kalamaula.

In the selection of the commission of those eight families, it was done with them choosing full-blooded Hawaiians, hapa Haole, and hapa Chinese. At the same time, considered were their ages and the children in their families.

The first eight Hawaiians and their families which were selected by the commission to go to the aina hoopulapula at Kalamaula Kai are here named below:

David K. Kamai, a full-blooded Hawaiian who is 41 years old, his occupation is a contractor and a carpenter. He has a wife and they have 11 children, 6 boys and 5 girls. He is a land owner and he has knowledge of taro cultivation, sweet potato, corn, cabbage, alfalfa grass and melons. He is prepared to go at once and live on the land when his application is approved.

Clarence K. Kinney, of Honolulu nei, is a hapa Haole, and is 42 years old. His occupation is an ukulele maker and a maker of umeke. He is married, and they have 7 children, 3 boys and 4 girls. He is a land owner. He was born on farm lands, with knowledge of dry land taro cultivation, sweet potato planting, corn, melon and other crops. He is ready to go to the aina hoopulapula in thirty days after his application is approved.

Albert Kahinu, Kaunakakai, Molokai. He is a hapa Hawaii that is 28 years old. He is employed by the Hawaiian Homes Commission on Molokai as a water pump engineer. He is married and they have one son. He knows how to raise chicken and pig, and how to plant sweet potato, banana, melon, and other crops. His wife is also knowledgeable in that kind of work. He does not own property, but is prepared to go at once to live on the homestead lands.

W. A. Aki, Honolulu, is a Hapa Chinese, and is 28 years old; he is an overseer of laborers. He is married and they have two children, a son and daughter. He is knowledgeable about planting crops to assist his family. His wife has been a school teacher for eight years at the Girls’ Correctional School at Kamoiliili. They are ready to go live on the aina hoopulapula.

John Puaa, Kaunakakai, Molokai, is a full-blooded Hawaiian, and is 52 years old; he is employed by the commission at Molokai. He is married, and they have 10 children, 5 boys and 5 girls. He has lived with his wife on a ranch for 25 years, and the two are knowledgeable at various work. They are prepared to go live on homestead lands without delay.

Harry Apo, Lahaina, Maui, is a hapa Chinese, and he works as a letter carrier. He is married, and they have 6 children, 4 girls and 2 boys. He lived at Lahainaluna School for two years, and four years at Kamehameha School, learning farming at Kamehameha. He is ready to move to the aina hoopulapula in July or August perhaps.

George W. Maioho, Kihei, is a hapa Chinese, and is 40 years old. He is married, and they have four children, 2 girls and 2 boys. He is capable of all sorts of work, from planting crops to raising livestock. He will go at once after his application is approved to live on the aina hoopulapula with his family.

William Kamakaua, Kawela, Molokai, is a full-blooded Hawaiian, and is 38 years old; he is employed by the commission on Molokai. He is married with 10 children, 5 sons and 5 daughters. He worked along with his wife on Molokai Ranch for 17 years. He is prepared to live on the homestead lands.

Of these eight families, only three will go first, because only three of the lots have been so far cleared by the commission to be farmed at once, and thereafter, other families will go when their lots are ready.

[There was a nice article in this month’s Ka Wai Ola, on page 5, about a remembrance of the first settlers of the Hawaiian Homes lands at Kalamaula. Here are more families that were chosen, listed in the Kuokoa on 8/17/1922.

Here is perhaps a more detailed article on the eight found in the Kuokoa on 7/6/1922, p. 2.]

(Kuokoa, 7/6/1922, p. 1)

Ewalu Ohana e Hoi e Ana no na Aina Hoopulapula ma Molokai

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LXI, Helu 27, Aoao 1. Iulai 6, 1922.

Hawaiian Homes on Molokai, 1922.

Eleven More People Approved for Lands on Molokai

The Hawaiian Homes Commission Selects Once More People for Homestead Lands on Molokai at the Meeting on this Past Tuesday

At the meeting of the Hawaiian Homes Commission on the afternoon of this past Tuesday, the commission selected eleven more people from amongst the many who applied to return to the homestead lands [aina hoopulapula] on Molokai; and added to the eight who the commission previously selected, that makes twenty Hawaiian families total who will be the first to go back to the twenty parcels opened up in Kalamaula, Molokai.

There are three parcels left to be divided up by the commission for twenty families and one section is set aside by the commission as an area to grow plants as a sample, and there are two pieces of land left to be surveyed.

There were seventy-nine applications submitted to the commission by Hawaiians, to return to homestead lands on Molokai, abut from amongst this number, there were thirty applications denied by the commission for appropriate reasons as deemed by them, and as for the rest, they were all approved.

The people whose applications were approved by the commission in that meeting are these below:

ZACCHARY PALI PAHUPU, who is 47 years old, a full Hawaiian, whose wife is also full Hawaiian, and they have seven children. He is employed at the ranch on Molokai.

K. KEALA KUPIHEA, who is 46 years old, a full Hawaiian, and so is his wife, and they have four children. He is a supervisor at the California Packing Corporation [CPC] in Wahiawa, Oahu.

HARRY A. HANAKAHI, who is 40 years old, three-fourths blooded Hawaiian, along with his wife who is full-blooded Hawaiian, and their seven children. He is a carpenter for the Hawaiian Contracting Co.

HENRY H. WISE, is 40 years old, a hapa Hawaiian, as well as his wife, along with their seven children. He is a carpenter by trade, and is living in Waimea, Kauai.

MRS. REBECCA KEALOHA KAAHU, is 32 years old, a full Hawaiian, and her husband is a Hawaiian as well, and they have five children. They reside in Kaunakakai, Molokai.

FRANK Y. ASEU, is 25 years old, Chinese-Hawaiian, and he has a Hawaiian wife, with two children. He is employed at the press of the Star-Bulletin Newspaper.

MRS. DAVID KAAI, is a hapa Hawaiian, and she has a full-Hawaiian husband, and they have eight children. They live in Kaunakakai, Molokai.

MRS. MIRIAM KAPANA, is 30 years old, she is full Hawaiian, she has a Hawaiian husband, and they have four children. They live on Auld Lane in this town.

MARCELLUS DUDOIT, is 34 years old, a hapa Hawaiian, and his wife is full Hawaiian, and they have seven children. He is an engineer working under the Hawaiian Contracting Co.

DANIEL K. HIPA, is 29 years old, a full Hawaiian, and he has a full-Hawaiian wife, and they have four children. He is a second mate aboard the ship the Bee.

DAVID K. MARTIN, is 43 years old, he is seven-eighths Hawaiian, and he has a full-Hawaiian wife, and they have four children. He is a house builder, and they reside in Kaimuki.

During that meeting of the commission, a resolution was passed clarifying that those who live on the homesteads mustĀ  live there permanently and not be allowed to move away from their land, except with approval from the commission with their promise that they will continue to farm and live on their land.

Put before the meeting of the commission were some terms of the lease drawn out by the attorney general and considerations of these were postponed until another time.

In the lease, it will specify the time when the person who applied must begin living on his land, that being within one year of his application being approved.

Another thing included in the lease is that it prohibits them from releasing out sections of their land to others; also, they are not to mortgage off their land, or do else wise other than what is approved of by the commission.

The secretary was instructed to send out letters to those whose applications were denied; as well as to those whose applications were approved but did not receive a parcel, asking them if they will leave their applications in until land is made available elsewhere on Molokai; and also to notify those who the commission selected that they will be put in a lottery [? komo ana iloko o ka helu] in the future when the homesteads open up.

(Kuokoa, 8/17/1922, p. 1)

Umi-kumamakahi Poe Hou i Aponoia no na Aina o Molokai

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LXI, Helu 33, Aoao 1. Augate 17, 1922.