In the collections of the Bishop Museum, 1903.

THE PEN WITH WHICH ROOSEVELT SIGNED THE FIRE CLAIMS BILL OF HAWAII.

Washington, Jan. 23. The pen with which the President signed the Hawaiian Fire Claims Bill [Bila Poho Ahi Hawaii] is a remarkable pen. This pen was made from the quill of a feather of a wild eagle, and that feather was taken from a war headdress of a wild Arapaho Indian. This pen is now in the care of Pratt to be placed in the Bishop Museum of Kamehameha in Honolulu.

This pen was gifted to the Hon. William A. Richards, a former Governor of Wyoming, and currently a Commissioner of Public Lands [Aina Aupuni]. This feather was taken by Richards from the headdress of an Arapaho Indian 18 years ago. He thought it was the right time for this feather to be put to some important use for Hawaii, therefore, he ordered one of the workers in his office to fashion the feather into a pen. Let it be remembered that this person who was given the feather to make a pen is a man of much seniority who was working in that office for fifty-one years.

(Aloha Aina, 2/7/1903, p. 1)

KA PENI A RUSEVALA I KAKAU AI I KA BILA POHO AHI O HAWAII.

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke IX, Helu 6, Aoao 1. Feberuari 7, 1903.

Be good to your parents while you can! 1911.

DESPERATELY WANTING TO HEAR FROM HIS BIRTH MOTHER

Because there arrived no letter from a mother to her child living in Larned, Kansas, over the past 12 months, this man has become very dejected. And his boss personally just sent a letter to Post Master Pratt of Honolulu nei, asking if perhaps his mother is living, because the man really wants to hear from her.

The name of this youth is George Higgins, and the name of his mother, from whom he desperately wants to hear from is Luka Kohololio [Kahololio]; and if the mother is still living, or any other relatives of Geo. Higgins, he would like terribly to hear from them, for living without word from his family has put him in depression.

In the letter sent by his boss to the the post master of this town, he speaks of the upright nature of the youth, and his good work ethic; however, because he has heard nothing from his birth mother for the past 12 months, it is something that he is constantly concerned about.

He keeps writing letter to his family here, without any response; therefore, his boss hopes that if there is any of them here still living, that they would brighten his disposition by responding.

The letter by his boss goes on to describe that the boy wants to go back home because of the lack of news from his mother. And the only means to take this load off of him is for one of his family here to write.

This boy was working for the Larned and Northwestern Railroad Co. in Kansas for some 10 or 11 years. And it seems that his boss is quite taken with him, as was shown in the letter expounding on all of his good traits.

Therefore, should Mrs. Luka Kahololio be alive, it would lessen the grief and sadness of her child should she write to him, and it is hoped that a speedy reply be sent to this boy living with thoughts of aloha for his mother.

(Kuokoa, 6/30/1911, pp. 1 & 4)

MAKEMAKE NUI E LOHE I KONA LUAUI MAKUAHINE

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLVII, Helu 26, Aoao 1 & 4. Iune 30, 1911.