Prejudice explained, 1901.

The Famous Black Man [Paele] in America.

THERE WAS MUCH PROTEST TO THE PRESIDENT INVITING HIM TO EAT WITH HIM.

Some Things Which Show the Hatred the Whites of the South Have for the Blacks to This Day.

Something that the people of the South of America are very incensed about now, that is because President Roosevelt invited Booker T. Washington, the very famous Paele in America these days, to go to the White House of the Capitol to dine with him. Perhaps none of us understand the cause of this anger, but these days, the hatred of the whites of the south have for the Paele like when these people lived as their slaves. The whites of the south know that this Paele is well educated, and there have been many a time that they went to him and showed him some things that were very unclear to them. So that we get an understanding of how the paele are hated, we will give a short illustration of a situation that is seen all the time at the home of this famous Paele. Continue reading

In the collections of the Bishop Museum, 1903.

THE PEN WITH WHICH ROOSEVELT SIGNED THE FIRE CLAIMS BILL OF HAWAII.

Washington, Jan. 23. The pen with which the President signed the Hawaiian Fire Claims Bill [Bila Poho Ahi Hawaii] is a remarkable pen. This pen was made from the quill of a feather of a wild eagle, and that feather was taken from a war headdress of a wild Arapaho Indian. This pen is now in the care of Pratt to be placed in the Bishop Museum of Kamehameha in Honolulu.

This pen was gifted to the Hon. William A. Richards, a former Governor of Wyoming, and currently a Commissioner of Public Lands [Aina Aupuni]. This feather was taken by Richards from the headdress of an Arapaho Indian 18 years ago. He thought it was the right time for this feather to be put to some important use for Hawaii, therefore, he ordered one of the workers in his office to fashion the feather into a pen. Let it be remembered that this person who was given the feather to make a pen is a man of much seniority who was working in that office for fifty-one years.

(Aloha Aina, 2/7/1903, p. 1)

KA PENI A RUSEVALA I KAKAU AI I KA BILA POHO AHI O HAWAII.

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke IX, Helu 6, Aoao 1. Feberuari 7, 1903.

President Roosevelt and Ikua Purdy, 1909.

A GIFT TO PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT.

One thing that President Roosevelt [Rusawela] was extremely pleased at from the steer-roping boys of Hawaii nei, was their gift that they sent by way of Representative Kuhio; and within a letter sent was a picture of Ikua Purdy, the champion roper of the world and canoe racer at Waikiki.

According to Representative Kuhio in his letter written to Jack Low, it expressed that the President was filled with joy at hearing that Ikua Purdy was actually the one who came away with the name champion of the world at steer roping.

This was the first he found out about the skill of the Hawaiian boys in roping steer, and it was Representative Kuhio who told him that Hawaiians enjoyed this activity for a long time, way before them hearing about the abilities of the boys of Wyoming.

On this past new year’s day, the paniolo boys of Waimea, Hawaii, held a steer-roping contest, with the idea that the boys who are proficeint at that activity would snatch the fame gained by Ikua Purdy, however, Ikua was the fastest at their contest; his time was like nine minutes [? seconds] less than his time in Wyoming.

There were twenty-five Waimea boys entered in this contest, but most of them fell, and Kamaki Lindsey took second place, with a time of fifty-seven seconds to rope, fell, and tie his steer.

(Kuokoa, 1/15/1909, p. 4)

KA MAKANA IA PERESIDENA RUSAWELA.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLVI, Helu 3, Aoao 4. Ianuari 15, 1909.