La Kuokoa information and more… 1700–1999.

For those of you interested, i came across this British Newspaper Archive site. It is unfortunately not free access. But if you want to know what their newspapers were saying about Haalilio and Richards and Paulet and Charlton as it all was going down (or other events that occurred between 1700–1999), it might be worth paying the subscription. Here for example there seem to be some four-thousand articles in the 1840s found using the search term “Sandwich Islands”:

http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/search/results/1840-01-01/1849-12-31?basicsearch=sandwich%20islands&exactsearch=false&page=0

And for the same period, there are five hits for “Haalilio”:

http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/search/results/1840-01-01/1849-12-31?basicsearch=haalilio&exactsearch=false

[Being that it is a pay for view site, i don’t believe that i would be able to repost articles found there even if i spent the money for a subscription myself…]

45th La Kuokoa celebration, 1888.

INDEPENDENCE DAY.

This coming Tuesday, November 28th, is the forty-fifth year celebration marking the recognition by the Heads of the Nations of Great Britain and France of Hawaiian independence; this day is set aside as a holiday all across the land. In other lands which enjoy independence through learning and enlightenment, independence day is seen as a day of rebirth for the nation and victory. These are great events found in the history of Hawaii’s friendly international relations; this is a distinction not received by any other island here in Polynesia; it has been nearly half a century that we remain proud of her unwavering  independence—progress—and enlightenment.

Long Live Hawaii Under God.

[On this the 170th anniversary of La Kuokoa, what are you doing to remember the great efforts taken by those like Timoteo Haalilio and William Richards to gain independence for the Nation?]

(Kuokoa, 11/24/1888, p. 2)

KA LA KUOKOA.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXVII, Helu 47, Aoao 2. Novemaba 24, 1888.

In the collections of the Bishop Museum, 1903.

THE PEN WITH WHICH ROOSEVELT SIGNED THE FIRE CLAIMS BILL OF HAWAII.

Washington, Jan. 23. The pen with which the President signed the Hawaiian Fire Claims Bill [Bila Poho Ahi Hawaii] is a remarkable pen. This pen was made from the quill of a feather of a wild eagle, and that feather was taken from a war headdress of a wild Arapaho Indian. This pen is now in the care of Pratt to be placed in the Bishop Museum of Kamehameha in Honolulu.

This pen was gifted to the Hon. William A. Richards, a former Governor of Wyoming, and currently a Commissioner of Public Lands [Aina Aupuni]. This feather was taken by Richards from the headdress of an Arapaho Indian 18 years ago. He thought it was the right time for this feather to be put to some important use for Hawaii, therefore, he ordered one of the workers in his office to fashion the feather into a pen. Let it be remembered that this person who was given the feather to make a pen is a man of much seniority who was working in that office for fifty-one years.

(Aloha Aina, 2/7/1903, p. 1)

KA PENI A RUSEVALA I KAKAU AI I KA BILA POHO AHI O HAWAII.

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke IX, Helu 6, Aoao 1. Feberuari 7, 1903.