Solidarity.

“Kūlia i ka nuʻu!”

strive for the heights

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Strive for the summit! 1899.

PERTAINING TO THE CASKET OF QUEEN KAPIOLANI.

Aboard the Australia which arrived from San Francisco was received the silver [wai dala] name plate for the top of the casket of Queen Kapiolani who sleeps at ease the eternal sleep, and on that plate are these words thus:

KAPIOLANI NAPELAKAPU

Wife of King Kalakaua

Born in Hilo, Hawaii, on the 31st of December, 1834.

Died at Honolulu, Oahu on the 24th of June, 1899.

64 Years, 5 Months, and 23 Days.

Also put on that plate will be the royal crown, the words “Kulia i ka Nuu” and “KK”.

(Aloha Aina, 11/4/1899, p. 4)

NO KA PAHU O KA MOIWAHINE KAPIOLANI.

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke V, Helu 44, Aoao 4. Novemaba 4, 1899.

Queen Liliuokalani travels to Kalawao, 1891.

Journey of the Alii, Queen Liliuokalani, to the Colony of Kalawao.

To the Editor of the “Daily Ko Hawaii Pae Aina,”

J. U. Kawainui,

Aloha oe:

At 10 at night on this past Sunday, April 26, 1891, the steamship Likelike left the wharf of Ainahou, taking upon her deck beloved Hawaii’s favorite, to see the group of the lahui who are in pain and great suffering. There were three hundred or so people on this tour. Here are the  dignitaries who went:

Queen Liliuokalani, Prince Keliianaole [Kalanianaole], Prime Minister Sam Parker, President D. Dayton, Agent of the Board of Health, Lalana, Hon. J. Nawahi, Hon. L. W. P. Kanealii, Hon. D. W. Pua, Hon. J. K. Hookano, E. Lilikalani, Hon. J. G. Hoapili, French Commissioner, Portuguese Commissioner, Mr. and Mrs. C. Clarke, Joseph Heleluhe, Mrs. Limaheihei, Mrs. Pamahoa Kalauli, Mr. and Mrs. S. M. Kaaukai, Mrs. L. Keohokalole, A. Mahaulu, Bishop Wills, Father Leolono, J. N. K. Keola, G. W. Kualaku, Tamara Meekapu, Mr. and Mrs. Auld and daughters, Mr. and Mrs. Ailau, Band Master Berger and 31 band members, two haole women, Mrs. Makanoe and father, Mrs. Kuihelani, Mahoe, Malaea Kaaipeelua, Lula Kahelemauna, Mrs. Akau and the many others for whom I have don’t have their names.

The ocean was fine, there wasn’t much wind, but there was enough wind to carry the favorite one, landing before her makaainana who suffer in pain. The light of the queen of the night shown down beautifully; the wheel of the princess, the younger sister, Likelike [referring to the ship], pushed against the sea of Kaiwi, the beloved sea, like a child carried before the friends in misfortune; eyes searching the tips of the waves for land, with sorrowful tears for their birth land. At 6 in the morning, on Monday, April 27, 1891 they landed at the harbor of Kalaupapa.

The mast in the aft of the Likelike flew the crown flag, announcing here I am with a heavy heart for all of you. The town of Kalaupapa was spread out before us, from the seaside to the uplands, with cliffs surrounding, lined up on the west side of the town.

The land was astir with people at the harbor wanting to embrace with tears the Queen and her people; and likewise the alii, the Queen, and her people wanted to do the same. Continue reading