Princess Kaiulani returns home, 1897.

PRINCESS KAIULANI.

This past Tuesday, the 10th of Nov., with the arrival of the steamship Australia, the “Princess” Kaiulani, and her birth father [luaui makuakane], Hon. A. S. Cleghorn returned. Her attire carried the “alii” colors of Hawaii nei, that being the yellow of mamo feathers and the red [“pai-ula”] of the oo. Upon her head was a lei of carnation “poni-moi” [coronation]. She was in fine health, and has the stature of a well-educated lady.

Before the ship docked, the wharf was filled with people of all of the different lahui among us; the most however were Hawaiians. And when the ship came of to the dock, she was clearly seen, and some sobbed at her sight. This was not the body of Kaiulani eight years ago, but this was Kaiulani at twenty years old. When she left the shores of her land of birth, she was bight a child [“kama”] of 10 or 12 years of age, and she looked very much like the picture below:

THE YOUNG PRINCESS.

Her features and Her demeanor in the days of Her youth.

But upon this return, she is a woman that is a full-grown adult, and invested upon her are all the qualities of an adult. Among the words she gave to the people who met with her aboard the ship, she expressed her joy in stepping once again on the sands of her birth. She stood on the ship for almost a half an hour being detained by the many friends who hugged her. “Aloha—aloha to the alii,” are the words from the mouths of the kanaka maoli. Thereafter, she stepped of of the ship, accompanied by her birth father, along with Miss Eva Parker and the “Prince” David Kawananakoa, and she stepped into the car. While the car headed up from the dock, the sides of the street were filled with spectators who gave their aloha to her, and the “young Alii” nodded to each one on both sides of the road at the places which expressed their aloha.

She left for her home in Waikiki.

TIMES TO SEE THE YOUNG ALII.

The young “Alii” Kaiulani is at her residence in Ainahau, Waikiki. She will have audience with the Hawaiians on Saturdays from 10 in the morning until 4 in the afternoon; and the others on each day at the hours set aside. On this Wednesday, she went into the uplands to the Crypt of the “Alii” up in Nuuanu.

THE PRINCESS KAIULANI

This Picture is taken from a lime-light picture [? kii hoolele aka] taken of her in London, a few months ago.

[It is good to be wary of the loyalties of the newspaper (just as it is today) when reading coverage of events. The Kuokoa seems to be at this time pro-annexation and anti-monarchy. This is reflected in their use of quotation marks around words like “Princess” and “Alii”.]

(Kuokoa, 11/12/1897, p. 1)

KE KAMALIIWAHINE KAIULANI.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXXVI, Helu 46, Aoao 1. Novemaba 12, 1897.

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