On ice and challenges and such, 1919 / timeless.

On Assisting Destitute Hawaiians

O True Hawaiians, rise, stand, and give a helping hand of aloha, oh to you, Hawaii’s own, the flesh of your flesh, the bone of your bone. Call out in welcome, feed, and nourish them, so they may make it through the days of hunger.

We are a number of true Hawaiians joining together to freely help our own facing hardship and difficulty in making a living; those who we do not know, in their poor and destitute condition. Therefore we ask by way of the one named later, for assistance from our fellow kanaka and wealthy people who have aloha for you, O Hawaii’s own, to give their donations to our office in the Japanese Fish Market on the upper side of Kekaulike Street, and there will be shown the truth of this plea before you, the people, and it is there that we will stay to make it understood to each and every fellow kanaka.

Just as with the pleas of the Red Cross (Kea Ulaula), Thrift Stamps (Pooleka Kaua), Liberty Bonds (Bona Kuokoa), to which we Hawaiians gave freely to those of foreign lands; this is our own Hawaiian people who are living in poverty, widows, and elderly who were kicked out by those who are responsible under the Law for their care, that being the Board of Health, and for that reason, we announce before you all, O True Hawaiians, come see us with aloha for the good of our own people living in poverty.

We believe in being honest, true, chaste, benevolent, virtuous, and in doing good to all men; indeed, we may say that we follow the admonition of Paul-We believe all things, we hope all things, we have endured many things, and hope to be able to endure all things. If there is anything virtuous, lovely, or of good report or praiseworthy, we seek after these things.¹

JOHN E. KAHOOKAUMAHA.

¹This is the thirteenth article in the Mormon articles of faith.

(Kuokoa, 3/28/1919, p. 2)

NO KE KOKUA ANA I NA HAWAII ILIHUNE.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LVII, Helu 13, Aoao 2. Maraki 28, 1919.

[The Aloha Aina also ran this announcement, but by this time, the typesetting done in this newspaper was not carefully done. There are frequent typesetting errors throughout. This can be seen in the parallel announcement found below.

One striking change however found in the Aloha Aina announcement is the phrase: “ka Papa Make (ka Papa Ola)” replacing “ka papa ola,” where they refer to the Board of Health as “the Board of Death”.]

No ke Kokou ana Ina Hawaii Ilihune

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke XXXIV, Helu 12, Aoao 4. Maraki 28, 1919.

Another promising brown bag from UHM Center for Biographical Research, 2013.

If you are free at noon this Thursday (4/4/2013), this sounds like an interesting brown bag. Hokulani K. Aikau talks about her new publication on Mormonism and Hawaiians. See below for more:

“A Chosen People, A Promised Land:

Mormonism and Race in Hawai‘i.”