More on painting by Hitchcock at Hilo Library, 1926.

PAINTING BY LOCAL ARTIST TO HANG IN HILO LIBRARY

D. HOWARD HITCHCOCK OFFERS PICTURE OF ISLAND SCENE TO PUBLIC HERE

D. Howard Hitchcock, Hawaii’s own master artist, has signified a desire to have his work with the brush and pallete represented publicly in his native city of Hilo, and has offered one of his paintings to the Hilo Public Library, where the picture is now on exhibition for a few weeks, pending the pleasure of the directors in accepting it.

The painting represents Mauna Kea glowing with high color from the setting sun, as seen from the Waimea plains, while the foreground lies in the cool tones of the gathering dusk. Continue reading

And of course, rice, 1862.

[Found under: “NEWS OF HAWAII NEI.”]

RICE.—We are overjoyed to see that rice is planted by one of our friends, S. Kamakahiki, in Hana, East Maui; there is a lot of grain and it is of good quality; why O Friends, are you dallying on planting this good source of money? We are amazed at the small number of people undertaking the growing of rice in Hana, for this is how it is, according to the letter of S. Kamakahiki, like this:

“I am the only one growing Rice here in Hana; I am harvesting the Rice and storing it at my house; I am filled with joy that I have found this good occupation.”

(Kuokoa, 2/15/1862, p. 2)

Raiki.

Cotton was grown here too, 1863.

Petaining to Cotton.

O Kuokoa Newspaper; Aloha oe:

I am reporting to you that the Cotton [Pulupulu] (Sea Island Cotton) is sprouting well in Waimea, Koolauloa, Oahu; you will surely rejoice with my fellow Cotton planters living in other places of these Islands, who planted this thing, Pulupulu, like me.

In the month of February of this very year I planted this Cotton field; it is perhaps an Acre and a half large, and because of the strong wind and the saturating showers of those days, the sprouting was late and slow; and some of it was eaten [amu ia] by army worms [“moo that sleep in the earth”] (kupa). In the month of April, that problem was over, and now, the plants have triumphed; they are growing well; it is like grape vines that are crawling here and there, and the bolls are developing; some are almost mature; I look over their bolls with satisfaction. I am not the only one who planted Cotton here in Waimea, but there are others who planted as well, because of your encouragement.

J. M. Kalanipoo.
Waimea, Oahu, June 22, 1863.

(Kuokoa, 6/27/1863, p. 1)

Kuokoa_6_27_1863_1

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