Encouragement by Daniel P. Aumai for more missionaries to come assist him at Abaiang, 1863.

Letter from Abaiang [Apaiana].

Tabonteba, Abaiang,
May 7, 1863.

To Rev. E. W. Clark:—Aloha oe, and Parker Jr., and all the elders of the Church, at Kawaiahao, and all the members. We met once more with the Hoku Ao on the 21st of May, and there is much joy for frequently meeting with us; we are blessed by hearing often the news from Honolulu, and sending news back from here. Continue reading

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Elizabeth Kupau remembers time in the Gilbert Islands, 1947.

HONOLULUANS AWAIT MORNING STAR VI ARRIVAL

At least four persons in Honolulu are anxiously awaiting the arrival of the American Board of Missions’ auxiliary schooner Morning Star VI.

The tentative arrival date for the Micronesia-bound missionary schooner is October 16.

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Mrs. Elizabeth Kupau of 643 Lana lane sailed to the Gilbert islands in 1898 aboard the Morning Star V. At that time she was a year old.

Her father was the late Rev. S. P. Kaaia whose pastorate had been located at Puna, Hawaii. Continue reading

On the death of Elizabeth Kawahinenohomaunaokilauea Kaaia, 1925.

EXPRESSION  OF LOVE FOR MRS. ELIZABETH KAWAHINENOHOMAUNAOKILAUEA KAAIA

The Almighty Father in heaven was kind to take the greatly loved mother, Mrs. Elizabeth Kawahinenohomaunaokilauea Kaaia from this disheartening life to eternal life.

She was a member of the church of Waianae, Oahu. She was a patient mother and was always strove do to the good works of her Lord in this church, and because the weakness that came upon her body, she could not participate bodily in the work for the last year of her life.

She was a kind mother and welcoming, and had an open heart, and she was hospitable to everyone who came to the home of her and greatly beloved husband, Rev. Samuel Peter Kaaia.

She spent 74 years old, 5 months and 10 days, and on the 12th of July, 1925, at 8:15 a.m., she grew weary of this life,and returned to the beauty of the home to rest for always which her Lord had prepared.

Her last service was held in the church by Rev. Henry P. Judd, the corresponding secretary [kakauleta] of the Hawaiian Mission, and at the grave by Rev. William K. Poai, the overseeing committee of the church, and present were the members of the Aloha Lahui Association [Ahahui Aloha Lahui] of Lahaina, and she was laid to rest in the cemetery of the church.

With her passing, she left behind her beloved husband, Rev. Samuel Peter Kaaia; their daughter, Mrs. Lowell K. Kupau [Elizabeth L. Kupau]; and 9 grandchildren, who grieve in love for her; and so too the family. How sad!

It has been resolved by us, the members of the church of Waianae, Oahu, along with the Church overseeing committee, Rev. William K. Poai, by way of our committee, to join with your, our Father Missionary, Rev. Samuel Peter Kaaia, your daughter, with your grandchildren and all of your family, in carrying the grief and sadness that has befallen upon you all, and we pray in the name of Jesus Christ, that He give us all relief.

We also resolved to send a copy of this to the husband who is without his intimate, travel companion, and fellow worker to make known to the church of the small islands of Marshall [Makala] and Gilbert [Gilibati], and the family, and one copy to the Friend [the church paper], and one copy to the Kuokoa Newspaper.

Sincerely,

HARRY G. POE
Committee Chairman

HENRY KAPELA

LOWELL K. KUPAU

[There is much history in the Hawaiian newspapers waiting to be found! Although the huge tome, “Partners in Change: A Biographical Encyclopedia of American Protestant Missionaries in Hawaiʻi and their Hawaiian and Tahitian Colleagues, 1820–1900” put out by the Hawaiian Mission Houses came out not that long ago, it does not seem to include Hawaiians sent as missionaries by the Hawaiian Board.

Meanwhile, “Nā Kahu: Portraits of Native Hawaiian Pastors at Home and Abroad, 1820–1900,” also published recently, has a listing for S. P. Kaaia, but no real information about Elizabeth, except that she is the daughter of J. H. Pahio and wife of S. P. Kaaia. It mistakenly gives her name as “Elizabeth Konoho.” You would imagine missionary wives played an important role, and should be acknowledged.]

(Kuokoa, 8/13/1925, p. 4)

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Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LXIV, Helu 33, Aoao 4. Augate 13, 1925.

Kilipaki and lauhala hats in Honolulu, 1903.

LAUHALA HATS SCARCE WHEN GILBERTESE LEAVE HONOLULU

Art of Hat Making is Falling Into Decadence Among the Hawaiians and Was Chief Industry Among the South Sea Islanders.

GILBERT ISLANDERS’ SETTLEMENT.

GILBERT ISLANDERS AT HOME.

With the departure of the Gilbert Islanders for their South Sea home in the British S. S. Isleworth, the art of native hat making is likely to fall into decadence. Strange as it may seem the majority of the native hats sold in Honolulu for many years past have been made by the Lewalewas who in turn were taught the art by the Hawaiians. Form the Island of Hawaii come the more expensive native hats, and the departure of the Gilbert Islanders will undoubtedly give an impetus to the art in Kona and Kohala.

In and around Honolulu there are but few Hawaiians who have the deft art at their fingers ends, and except among the older generations of natives, little about hat making is known. As with hat weaving, so with the making of mats. An old native woman at Waikiki is one of the few who can repair mats, and another in Manoa valley still manufactures mats, large and small. The present generation of Hawaiians has not added hat and mat weaving to its accomplishments.

A couple of years ago the Gilbert Islanders has a village on the naval reservation on the Waikiki side of the harbor channel. Camera fiends and brush artists found the village a picturesque attraction, where nearly all the women villagers manufactured the cheaper grade of hats which were sold here for $1 and $1.50.

The Honoluluans will miss the Gilbert Islanders from the streets on which they appeared barefooted and generally with about half a dozen of the cheap hats in their hands, going from one store to another in quest of a purchaser for the lot. When a tourist arrives in Honolulu about the first thing he or she does is to seek a curio store and invest in a native hat, and after adorning it with a flaring striped pugaree “do” the sights of the city. The hats have always an attraction for the newcomer. But few of the malihinis or even kamaainas have ever seen them made. Continue reading