Let everyday be Mother’s Day, but… 1941.

[Found under: “Na Hunahuna Mea Hou o Maui.”]

The observance of Mother’s Day throughout the world was a great day. Every mother has a respect to mankind for she is queen among her friends and family.

M—stands for mother the one we all love

O—is for the others that are watching from above

T—is for the tears she shed for us, and

H—for the heart we always could trust,

E—is for the ears they listened to our cries,

R—is for remembrance when she dies, and

S—stands for saints which will greet in Paradise.

D—is for the death that will take her away,

A—stands for aloha which means love in the Hawaiian way

Y—remains for the years of love which have woven into a beautiful lei.

[This appears in Mrs. Banham’s regular column on news items from Maui. Acrostics also appear in Hawaiian-Language Newspapers in the Hawaiian Language from very early on.]

(Hoku o Hawaii, 5/14/1941, p. 1)

The observance of Mother's Day...

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Volume XXXVI, Number 3, Aoao 1. Mei 14, 1941.

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Lei Day in Lahaina, 1944.

[Found under: “Na Hunahuna Mea Hou O Maui”]

Lei Making is Held

Last week, an event was held to commemorate Lei Day by the classes of Lahainaluna School.

The May Day queen was Kuulei Bechert and her attendant was Theone Freeland.

The featured things at this event were the display of items of koa, the lei, lauhala and applique quilt [kapa apana]. The koa display was from Mrs. G. Alan Freeland, and lauhala was done by Mrs. C. K. Kunane. The lei were done by some classes of the school watched over by Hannah Reimann.

Also undertaken was the selling of war bonds and the proceeds reached $10,000.

The quilt, “Ka Lama o Lahainaluna” [The Light of Lahainaluna] was on a dark background with a pattern of kukui leaves, fruit, and torch, which was spread out to be seen.

Mrs. John T. Moir, Jr., was the adviser of this event, and Mrs. Alice Banham was her assistant along with William McWayne; they were the supervisors of this program.

(Hoku o Hawaii, 5/17/1944, p. 1)

Malama Na Hana Lei

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Volume XXXIX, Number 4, Aoao 1. Mei 17, 1944.

Maui news columnist, Kanoekaapunionalani Banham, 1940.

Bits of Maui News

(Written by “Kanoekaapunionalani”)

Mrs. Banham

The Christmas celebration on Maui last year was very nice, even if the rain was falling.

Every household took steps [to celebrate] by decorating the tree in their front yard as a Christmas tree, being that a majority of the christmas trees from America were dried up; but this did not hold up their festivities.

Last week there were a huge number of passengers carried here to Maui by the steamer Hualalani, and there were teachers and students who returned to spend their vacation at home with their families.

Those who came back are Marjory Rickard, Elsie and Grechen Reichardt, Frances Kalua, Pauline and Beatrice Mookini, Harry Dunn, Issac Oha [Oba?], Sonny Cockett, Henrietta Robinson, Caroline Brown and Robineta Tompkin.

Francis McMillen of Wahiawa, a student of the Kamehameha School for Boys, is spending his grandmother, Mrs. C. K. Kunane of Lahaina.

It is sad to hear of the passing from this world of Mr. Kulhman, the first Cane Burner [Puhiko] of the Pioneer Mill Company [Hui Mahiko Paionia]. He became important amongst the kamaaina, and he was one of the most skilled at Burning Cane.

The locals of Lahaina are saddened at his passing, and he has left a hole that cannot be soon filled.

[Lahainaluna School dorm matron Alice Kanoekaapunionalani Kunane Banham had a regular column in the Hilo newspaper, Hoku o Hawaii, where she reported all sorts of Maui news of the day.]

(Hoku o Hawaii, 1/3/1940, p. 1)

Na Hunahuna Mea Hou O Maui

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Volume XXXIV, Number 36, Page 1. Ianuari 3, 1940.