One more from the Deshas, 1944.

Our Day

THE CALM SEAS OF KONA

At four o’clock on Friday, February 18, and in the Central Kona Union Church, Miss Clara Rose Blank was joined in holy covenant of matrimony with George Ernest Cherry of Kona Inn. Rev. Desha read the lines of the mele which made the two of them into one. The attendants [ku aoao] were R. Leighton Hind for Mr. Cherry and Mrs. Frances Cushingham for Miss Blank.

These are haole youths, but they lived here in Kona for a long time, and have become kamaaina. Miss blank is working for the University Extension Service, and her work takes her into the different homes. One of her duties is to teach housewives how to cook nutritious foods. When guava is ripe, she taught the mothers how to make jelly.

Mr. Cherry is the head of Kona Inn, and they will live at the hotel.

 After the wedding a celebratory party was held for the married couple at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Francis Cushingham of Kealakekua. The club of Kini Ka played and sang the songs of Hawaii nei.

On Friday, February 25, a meeting was held called a Day of Prayer for the World by the mothers of Kona. The mothers gathered in Christ Church, Kealakekua, the Episcopal church of Kona nei.

This endeavor was begun by the women of New York, America, and they sent their program to Christian women all over the world who have the same thought, that is peace on earth. All the various ethnicities participated in the activities of the day. The leader of this exercise was Mrs. Miller the wife of the Episcopal pastor of Kona. Some girls of Kona Waena High School sang; there were perhaps eleven of them.

The spirit of the day and the prayer went like this: With all of your though, with all your heart, with all your soul, and with all your strength.

(Hoku o Hawaii, 3/8/1944, p. 2)

Ko Maua La

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Volume XXXVIII, Number 46, Aoao 2. Maraki 8, 1944.

Kona Inn ad in English, 1939.

KONA INN

ISLAND OF HAWAII

The Kona Inn will do everything to make

Life Enjoyable

Inter-Island Steamship Co.,

Limited

AGENTS FOR KONA INN

(Hoku o Hawaii, 4/26/1939, p. 1)

Kona Inn

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Volume XXXIII, Number 52, Aoao 1. Aperila 26, 1939.

Kona Inn ad in Hawaiian, 1947

HOKELE KONA

MOKUPUNI O HAWAII

E hoomohala aku no ka Hokele Kona i na mea e Hoohauoli ai i ka olioli o ka Uhane

HUI MOKU HOLO PILI-AINA,

Kaupalenaia

Na Agena No Ka Hokele Kona

(INTER-ISLAND STEAM NAV. CO., LTD.

Agents for Kona Inn

(Hoku o Hawaii, 8/6/1947, p. 1)

HOKELE KONA

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Volume XLI, Number 11, Aoao 1. Augate 6, 1947.

More from the Deshas, 1944.

Our Day

THE CALM SEAS OF KONA

Kealakekua, Thursday, April 27, 1944. This morning the Rev. Desha went down to Kailua, to the Kona Inn, to fetch his namesake grandchild, Winona Beamer. She had a friend with her. The Rev. Desha went with our first child, Stephen Desha III, to take Winona Beamer and her friend to Hale o Keawe at Honaunau. They saw the Stone of Keoua [Pohaku a Keoua], the stone konane board, the stone with holes to bury the umbilical cord of babies of those days, the stone that Kaahumanu used to hide from Kamehameha with, and the stone god figures.

After their tour was over they returned to Napoopoo and saw the Monument to Opukahaia and the bay of Kealakekua. And after that was done, they came back to our home to eat lunch. After lunch, we had an enjoyable time with Winona Beamer with the piano and all of us singing.

At 2:00 p. m., a haole arrived, Mr. Lester, a friend of these girls, and we all went to Huehue, to the home of those friends, Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Vredenberg [Vredenburg]. We spent a pleasant time with Mrs. Vredenberg and saw her drawings of all sorts of flowers. One of her pictures was of the flower of the Hawaiian ape. These drawings were not small, they were big indeed. The length of this drawing is around three feet while the width is about two feet and a half. If you look at this drawing, it looks as if it is growing in the picture. After enjoying our time, we turned back and the visitors returned to the Kona Inn.

Friday, April 28, 1944. At 9:00 this morning, the two of us went to the Dentist [Hale Kauka huki niho] and had a checkup. My tooth was chipped from eating the charred skin from a kalua pig. I ate it because it was tasty, and alas my tooth became chipped. I was so lucky, the doctor said it was not a big thing to insert a new tooth, and that is what he will do.

[This was a fun account, perhaps mostly because I know the awesome daughter of Theodore and Beatrice Vredenburg!]

(Hoku o Hawaii, 5/10/1944, p. 1)

Ko Maua La

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Volume XXXIX, Number 3, Aoao 1. Mei 10, 1944.