Lahainaluna School news, 1867.

Items from Lahainaluna College.

Crops.—The plants are thriving in front of the school house and the student’s dormitory, as well as in the back; those being: bananas, gourds, and trees as well, such as the pride of India, and kukui, which are all also thriving; it is very pleasant to look at, and the barrenness will perhaps be no more. But this is a considerably new thing.

The sugar cane patch.—The cane patch seems to be growing well, it is on the left side of the road going down to Lahainalalo.

The taro patches.—The teachers and land supervisors are putting effort into working the students in the patches to increase food so that they will not face problems with hunger. The patches being worked are large, and the loi that were not used before are being worked, those being the ones below the river, and the ones above it are starting to be worked (the ones at the school), and the farming is going well, and the taro production will perhaps increase in this upcoming year.

The canal.—The new auwai is being started under the direction of Mr. Andrews. This auwai runs next to the pali, and it’s source is in the district of Auwaiawao; it is called “Pipikapau” and the water will reach the dry patches here above. The students will be truly blessed by this auwai.

The anatomy book (“Anatomia”).—The College is lacking a volume of this type, but it is not totally without, there are a few; although there were a great many in the past years, this year, they are without the printed book, and the second class is being taught from a handwritten book. They are terribly lacking.

Human bones.—On Saturday, the 20th of this month, the second class went to Makaiwa, close to Kekaa, and bags were filled with bones so that they could see the kinds of bones as in Anatomia.

Lantern slides.—Pictures were projected by our instructor, S. E. Bishop, on the night of the 24th of this month in the Church; all the students gathered together, and also there were some of the teachers.
The activities that night were fine.

Joint school.—Every Wednesday, all the grades join together, from the 1st class to the 4th, and the 1st class checks the mistakes in what is written by the other classes in response to the questions given by Andrews. They join together at 10 o’clock on every Wednesday.

The enrollment.—There are 103 students at this school. And Andrews teaches the students at 5 o’clock in the evening every Wednesday, and perhaps the children are acquiring this knowledge.

Break.—The school might go on vacation during the month of December, for a month. This is what we hear from the President, whether it be true or not.

J. Kaohukoloiuka.
Lahainaluna, July 26, 1867.

(Kuokoa, 8/3/1867, p. 3)

Na mea o ke Kulanui o Lahainaluna.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke VI, Helu 31, Aoao 3. Augate 3, 1867.

Pretty cool map of Honolulu, 1845.

HONOLULU.

In the picture above, clear are the yards and streets, and the layout of Honolulu, the great city of Hawaii. Here is where the King lives permanently, as well as the Prime Minister, and the Nation’s Legislature.

By the numbers on the picture, each place is clearly recognized, Thusly:

1. Residence of the King.

2. Fort, where the Governor lives.

3. Church of the King at Kawaiahao, where Armstrong preaches salvation.

4. Catholic Church, of Maigret them.

5. Smith’s Church at Kaumakapili.

6. Haole church at Polelewa, of Damon

7. School of the Young Chiefs

8. Hotel, “welcoming house”.

9. Government building at Honolulu.

10. Government printing house.

11. Haole school.

12. Store of Brewer them.

13. Store of Pele [Bell?] them.

14. Infirmary for the sailors from America.

15. Infirmary for the sailors from Britain.

16. Infirmary for the sailors from France.

17. British Consulate.

18. American Consulate.

19. French Consulate.

20. Building of the American diplomats.

21. House of Damon the pastor of the sailors.

22. Street going to Nuuanu.

23. Street going to Ewa.

24. Street going to Waikiki.

25. Inner Harbor.

26. French Hotel.

27. Place of the American missionaries.

This is the number of stores in Honolulu.

Clothiers, 11.

Small shops, 14.

Auction houses, 2.

Hotels, 5.

Establishments not selling liquor, 6

Saloons, 6.

(Elele, 10/7/1845, pp. 105–106.)

HONOLULU.

Ka Elele, Buke 1, Pepa 14, Aoao 105-106. Okatoba 7, 1845.