Joseph Kahaulelio Naoo passes on, 1924.

GRIEF AND ALOHA FOR JOSEPH KAHAULELIO, MY DEAR HUSBAND WHO HAS GONE AFAR.

O Mr. Editor of the Kuokoa, Aloha a nui:—Please in your kindness allow me some space in your thing of pride, so that the family and friends of my dear husband, Joseph Kahaulelio, may know that he left this life from the home of his daughter, Mrs. Kuuleialoha Whaley, at Pearl City, Ewa, on Monday, Aug. 18, 1924, at 2 o’clock p. m., before me, his wife, and our children and grandchildren, on that evening that he was taken by the Borthwick Company to Honolulu to be cleansed.

My husband was born at Honouliwai, Molokai, by Kamaka (f) and Joseph Naoo (m); there were three children, and the elder sibling and younger sibling of my husband were taken earlier, leaving just him, but there are many children and grandchildren living who…

JOSEPH KAHAULELIO NAOO.

…are living, who grieve from this side.

In the days of his youth, his occupation was caring for horses and breaking in new horses, and because he was proficient at this work, he became important to his employers, and as his bosses were getting ready to leave Hawaii nei, they instructed him to take a wife, and he carried out their instructions, and when his bosses were ready to go back, they urged Joseph Kahaulelio and his wife to go along to California, and their wishes were followed without any hesitation or uncertainty; his bosses instructed them to make ready, for they would be leaving Maui behind with Los Angeles as their destination, and they went with their bosses over the sea to this foreign land, and there he lived and worked with his beloved employers, Mr. and Mrs. Willie Bailey, for nine years, and from their garden sprang three children, two girls and one boy, and because his companion, his first wife, left him, he asked his employers to let him go back to the land of his birth, and when he stepped onto the shores of his birth sands, his heavy thoughts were lightened, and after living with his children, he found a new wife, this being his second wife, and this mother died as well, and he married once again with me, and in my bosom he grew weary of me and the children and grandchildren of ours.

He lived and worked aboard the government refuse collecting scow on the sea for a number of years, and was a sweeper at the dock, and he stayed there for a long time, for thirty years, and during the last session of the legislature he was one who received livelihood support.

My husband has a big family now living: three children with sons-in-law, sixteen grandchildren, and one great-grandchild, the precious pearls given by God as a monument to him.

He was a brethren of the joint Kawaiahao and Moiliili Church. It is He who giveth and He who taketh away; blessed always be His holy name.

Me in sorrow,

MRS. ANA KAHAULELIO,

And the Family.

(Kuokoa, 9/4/1924, p. 6)

HE U HE ALOHA NO JOSEPH KAHAULELIO, KUU KANE HELE LOA.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LXIII, Helu 36, Aoao 6. Sepatemaba 4, 1924.

Another political mele for Curtis Piehu Iaukea, 1904.

C. P. IAUKEA THE REPRESENTATIVE THAT WILL SAVE HAWAII.

P—Piha hauoli na mokupuni,
I—I ke Alakai hou o Hawaii,
E—Eia mai ka Elele Lahui,
H—Hanohano ai oe e Hawaii,
U—Ua kohu pono ma ia kulana.

I—Imua kakou e ka lahui,
A—A welo hou e ka Hae Hawaii,
U—Ua lokahi na makaainana,
K—Kakoo like i ka Moho Lahui,
E—E ola ka Elele Demokalaka,
A—A au i ke kai me ka lanakila.

[The islands are filled with joy,
In the new Leader of Hawaii,
Here is the Representative,
In whom you, O Hawaii, will be proud,
He will be right for the position.

Let us move forward, O Lahui,
And let the Hawaiian Flag flutter once more,
The citizens are unified,
And support together the Candidate of the People,
Long live the Democratic Representative,
And travel the sea in victory.]

[Once again inspired by a post by Nanea Armstrong-Wassel. Here is the mele she speaks of  by Ernest Kaai, “Lanakila Iaukea,” found in the Kuokoa, 10/26/1906, p. 4, here.]

(Aloha Aina, 11/5/1904, p. 4)

C. P. IAUKEA KA ELELE OLA HAWAII.

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke X, Helu 46, Aoao 4. Novemaba 5, 1904.