Lines of familiar mele used in stories to elicit emotion, 1895.

[Found in: “HE MOOLELO NO Frank Reade Opio”]

Ike aku i ka ono o ka wai o ia pua,
Upu ae ka manao e kii aku e ako.

[I know of the sweet nectar of that flower,
The desire wells up to go and pluck it.]

[The use of lines of well-known mele like from Thomas Linsey’s “Honesakala” above is a feature of Hawaiian storytelling. They elicit a feeling or mood to help the flow of the moolelo. This particular translation of  one of the Frank Reade Jr. stories ran in Hawaiian in the Kuokoa from 5/25/1895 to 11/9/1895 under the title “He Moolelo no Frank Reade Opio: Ka Mea Nana i Hana ka Moku Lele ma ka Lewa-lani…”]

(Kuokoa, 8/17/1895, p. 1)

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Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXXIV, Helu 33, Aoao 1. Augate 17, 1895.

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Sigh, 2018.

Did you see last week Monday’s post on Welo Hou? It is funny how mele written by someone from a long time ago can stir up personal memories, both good and bad. Thomas Lindsey’s “Honesakala” is timeless. Does anyone know which Thomas Lindsey this was.

Click the sheet music below to check it out:

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MS SC Roberts 2.2, p. 3. “Honesakala”