Chinese New Year celebrated in Hilo, 1883.

Island Notes.

HAWAII—HILO.

Genial showers are falling, the cane is growing, the mills grinding, and everything promises prosperity.

Yesterday the Chinese New Year, or Konohi, passed off in grand celestial style. Bales of firecrackers, Chinese bombs and Roman candles were exploded, and any amount of chickens, rice and sweetmeats were consumed. The layout was grand in every Chinese establishment. The blooming jonquils, fragrant lilies and other flowers formed the background to their loaded tables. All were welcome and hospitality was dealt out indiscriminately with a free hand. Continue reading

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Kawaiahau Glee Club performs at Progress Hall, 1904.

A NIGHT OF PLEASURE OF HALALII.*

The Kawaihau Glee Club announced that it will hold a night of pleasure of Halalii at Progress Hall, on the Ewa corner of Beritania and Fort Streets, tomorrow night. The club will get together with all its eighteen members, offering their merry voices and joyous music, while those who go there will spin with their partners. Continue reading

More on Ipo Lei Manu, 1892.

[Found under: “LOCAL AND GENERAL NEWS.]

The Bulletin acknowledges the receipt of the music and words of two hula kuis—”Ipo Lei Manu” and “Pua Melekule”—the first ever printed. They have been copyrighted by Mr. W. F. Reynolds of the Golden Rule Bazaar, in both the Hawaiian Islands and the United States. A few copies arrived by the last steamer, which can be had at the Bazaar at fifty cents a copy.

[One year after the death of King Kalakaua, the mele gets copyrighted by someone who obviously did not compose it, as so often happens to Hawaiian music. What is interesting is that I have not found any public performances in Hawaii of this song until after 1924.]