Mary Jane Fayerweather weds, 1864.

MARRIED.

Ladd—Drew—On the 5th inst., by the Rev. Father Hermann, Mr. W. N. Ladd to Miss Joanna Drew, both of Honolulu.

Davidson—Fayerweather—In Honolulu, July 4th, by Rev. S. C. Damon, Mr. Benoni R. Davidson to Miss Mary Jane Fayerweather, both of Honolulu.

(PCA, 7/9/1864, p.2)

PCA_7_9_1864_2

The Pacific Commercial Advertiser, Volume IX, Number 2, Page 2. July 9, 1864.

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Mary Jane Fayerweather Montano story part 3 continued, 1893.

FORMER BELLE TELLS OF SOCIETY IN OLD HONOLULU

(Continued from Page 5)

Dr. Ed. Hoffmann as chairman of the general committee, we went to the ball. There I met Miss Mary Burbank, Dr. Hoffmann’s young niece, who was assisting him to do the honors of the evening. It seemed in those days no function was complete without Dr. Hoffmann, who was a prominent gentleman here. He was deeply interested in Hawaiian affairs. A few years later, sometime in the 70s, he encouraged us to send Hawaiian fancy work to the Berlin exposition. I made pumpkin straw flowers made from the white, satiny fiber of the pumpkin stalks and a few months afterward I received a gold locket and chain as a prize. It was sent on in care of Dr. Hoffmann. Continue reading

Mary Jane Fayerweather Montano story part 3, 1893.

Former Belle Tells Of Honolulu Society In Far-Off ‘Sixties’

Mrs. Montano Continues Her Charming Reminiscences of Old Hawaii; Notable Characters and Incidents Revived After Six Decades During Which Community Has Moved Far, Far Away From  Them

BY MARY JANE FAYERWEATHER MONTANO

(Continued from last Sunday)

A year or more after the smallpox epidemic, which swept our Islands in 1853, came a greater shock to the Hawaiian nation. King Kauikeaouli, Kamehameha III, died, the loved one of the Hawaiian people. Every man, woman and child wept. After a few days the Palace gates were opened to the public and there was also a call to all to cover the streets with fine grass. I went out for grass which was to be found in the kalo patches. The kalo patches were not very far from Beretania street in those days. I did not follow the others, but I went right into the King’s gardens, called Beretania, where the Episcopal Cathedral now stands. I stepped into a kalo patch and picked an armful of the soft grass. Tears blinded my eyes. I thought of the day when His Majesty called to see my mother. He ran his fingers through my  hear, and asked my mother, “Is this your little ‘white hair'”? Mother answered, “Yes”. Continue reading