A procession, 1886.

[Found under: “Kela me Keia.”]

Here is something else: In the morning of the Sabbath, Dec. 15, at Ainahou, news of a procession was sniffed out by the puffing nostril of the steamship Eleu. While it was at leisure and to its great amazement, its gaze fell upon a large number of men and women walking in a row in the tall house, nearby at the ocean. They were men girded in malo lenalena, if he was not mistaken, and women in pāʻū lenalena. Shortly thereafter, they disappeared perhaps into a room, and were no longer seen. In theory they could be the “ball of twine society” [ahahui Popo Kuaina] spoken of, or perhaps the descendants of the hale naua. With his bewildered thoughts floating within, he snickered as he recalled his dream of a procession of red gods with small heads, long legs, branched bones, scaly finger nails [??? makiao unahi], and so forth. Then his hair bristled, and he returned home.

[This is a curious article found in the Kuokoa.]

(Kuokoa, 12/11/1886, p. 3)

Kuokoa_12_11_1886, p.png

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXV, Helu 50, Aoao 3. Dekemaba 11, 1886.

Kalakaua Day, 1916.

KALAKAUA DAY TO BE OBSERVED FOR FIRST TIME

Morning Reception, Appearance of Pa-u Riders and Dance at Night Make Up Program

in honor of the Kalakaua Dynasty which ruled over the Hawaiian Islands for 22 years, Honolulu will celebrate tomorrow, and the day will be filled with many pleasant features.

The big affair of the day will occur in the evening when the reception and ball at the armory will be held. Because of the illness of Queen Liliuokalani, she will not be able to attend, but in her place Prince and Princess Kalanianaole will receive the guests. After the reception three orchestras will furnish music for the dancing and a gala time is anticipated. A large number of invitations have been issued and to be sure that no one was overlooked Princess Kawananakoa chairman of the invitation committee, wishes all who have not received invitations to go to the Promotion Committee rooms on Bishop street.

The festivities of the day will begin in the morning when 21 pa-u riders will gather at Princess Auto Stand on King street and from there, headed by Princess Theresa Wilcox, president and wife of the first delegate to congress, and Mrs. J. Fern, vice-president, will march up King street to Aala park. From there the march will return on King and up Fort, to Hotel, then Bishop, King and up Richards to the residence of Queen Liliuokalani, where a short call will be made. From the queen’s residence the riders will follow Beretania street to Pensacola street to the home of Princess Kawananakoa, where a reception will be held from 9 to 12 in the morning. Here a short speech will be made by a member of the riders. In the evening the pa-u riders will attend the ball in full costume of royal purple with leis around their necks and a golden band on which is the word “Kaohelelani,” the name of a descendant of the royal house of Keoua, the father of the Kamehamehas.

The reception of Princess Kawananakoa is for Hawaiians only and therefore no one else will be permitted inside the grounds unless they have a special invitation.

(Star-Bulletin, 11/15/1916, p. 8)

KALAKAUA DAY TO BE OBSERVED FOR THE FIRST TIME

Honolulu Star-Bulletin, Volume XXIV, Number 7674, Page 8. November 15, 1916.

King Kalakaua’s birthday to become a new holiday? 1916.

CELEBRATED WAS THE BIRTHDAY OF KING KALAKAUA YESTERDAY

THE DAY WAS CELEBRATED BY HAWAIIANS, THE HAOLE, THE LOCALS, AND THE NEWCOMERS, WITH THE THOUGHT THAT IT WOULD BECOME A NATIONAL HOLIDAY IN THE FUTURE.

1836—1891

[Williams Photo]

KALAKAUA’S BIRTHDAY CELEBRATED.

For the first time, a commemoration of the birthday of King Kalakaua held extensively here in this city yesterday; this day will be celebrated in the future as is the birthday of the Conqueror of the Nation, Kamehameha.

In years past, there were but a very few people who celebrated this day, but from now on, the birthday of Kalakaua will be a day that is important in the history of Hawaii nei.

The activity taking place on the first celebration was the pa-u riding of twenty-one women of the Kaohelelani Pa-u Riders presided over by Mrs. Theresa Wilcox Belliveau. Continue reading

Labor Day, 1920.

LABOR DAY HOLIDAY IN HONOLULU NEI.

More than a thousand laborers of all trades all came together in the parade to celebrate Labor Day [La o na Limahana] in this town. The picture on the top left, are the men of the carpenter’s union in the parade; to the right are the men of the streetcar union. Below, in the center, is some of the crowd gathered on the Palace Grounds to listen to the speeches; on the left is Mrs. Estelle Baker, one of the speakers; and on the right is Mayor John H. Wilson.

(Kuokoa, 9/10/1920, p. 1)

KA LA KULAIA O NA LIMAHANA MA HONOLULU NEI.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LVIII, Helu 37, Aoao 1. Sepatemaba 10, 1920.

Annual Firemen’s Parade, 1864.

Announcement

of the

Fire Department!

THE ANNUAL PARADE of the “Honolulu Fire Department,” happening on this coming Monday, the 12th. The Companies are asked to gather in the front of the firehouse NUMBER 2 at 10 o’clock in the morning, with their uniforms and engines.

By order of

C. THOMAS GULICK,

Secretary of the O. K. [Oihana Kinaiahi]

Honolulu, Dec. 10, 1864.

(Kuokoa, 12/10/1864, p. 3)

Olelo Hoolaha a ka Oihana Kinaiahi!

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke III, Helu 50, Aoao 3. Dekemaba 10, 1864.