More on Kamehameha III 100th birthday memorial, 1914.

CENTENARY OF KAMEHAMEHA III IS MARKED WITH IMPRESSIVE SERVICE

Handsome Tablet Is Unveiled Accompanied by Sacred Chant of Loved King

The unveiling of a handsome tablet of Hawaiian lava granite, to the accompaniment of sacred chants composed a century ago, marked the 100th anniversary of the birth of Kauikeaouli, the third of the Kamehamehas, which yesterday afternoon was observed at old Kawaiahao church by the Daughters of Hawaii. It was a fitting memorial to that ruler who, known to his subjects as the beneficent king, gave to the inhabitants of these islands their first written constitution, and, to make the observance further complete, the tablet will be taken to Keauhou, Kona, where it will mark the birthplace of ka moi lokomaikai.

The historical structure of Kawaiahao, around which is woven innumerable tales dear to the heart of the kamaaina, was occupied by more than 2600 persons, the majority of whom were Hawaiian. The memorial tablet occupied the center of the platform, hidden from view by the royal standard of Liliuokalani and High Chiefess Elizabeth Kekaaniau Pratt, both lineal descendants of the Hawaiian King who was the founder of the Kamehameha dynasty. Feathered cloaks of almost priceless value draped the chairs in which they sat.

The strange, yet beautiful, setting doubtless was a perfect replica of a court scene in the days of the old regime when the Kamehameha held sway. The costuming of the participants was perfect, and there was presented a spectacle in which was brought out many ancient and rare relics which today are treasured by Honolulu families and which are seldom seen other than in private homes, where they are held almost sacred.

Attired in feather cloaks and helmets, High Chief Fred Kahapula Beckley and High Chief Albert Kalaninoanoa Hoapili, the spear and kahili bearers respectively, occupied places just back of the queen and High Chiefess Pratt, representing the figures which are seen on the royal Hawaiian coat-of-arms. Both are lineal descendants of chiefs of the court of Kamehameha I, High Chief Beckley being a descendant of Kameeiamoku, and High Chief Hoapili a descendant of Kamanawa, the royal kahili bearer. Boys from the Kamehameha school, to the number of 16, acted as court attendants and kahili bearers, and occupied places on either side of the court representatives. They were attired in feather capes and other accessories adopted by the Hawaiian warriors of other days. Above this gathering was suspended the royal standard of Kalakaua, as well as other Hawaiian flags, their colors blending in perfect harmony with the vivid green of the palms and ferns with which the nave was banked.

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