Joseph Liwai Kukahi retires from post office, 1924.

VETERAN POSTAL EMPLOYE HONORED BY HIS ASSOCIATES

Joseph Liwai Kukahi was a proud man yesterday when his fellow employes at the post office presented him with a handsome gold watch in token of his long service. Continue reading

Kumulipo, published by Joseph Liwai Kukahi, 1902.

A FINE MOOLELO BOOK

“KE KUMULIPO,” A HAWAIIAN MOOLELO TO BE PUBLISHED BY JOSEPH L. KUKAHI.

We received a Hawaiian moolelo book being published by our good friend, Joseph L. Kukahi. The name of this book is “Ke Kumulipo,” and it is an authentic Hawaiian moolelo book showing the different ideas about the birth of this archipelago. Within this book are a number of beautiful mele showing the thoughts of the ancient composers of mele of ours pertaining to the birth of the first man, the first woman, and the land upon which we live. Continue reading

John Shorland Wilmington retires as postmaster of Kalaupapa, 1925.

THAT HAWAIIAN LEFT HIS POST FLAWLESSLY

This past May, John Shorland Wilmington turned in his resignation, requesting in that letter to leave the position as Postmaster of Kalaupapa, Molokai, on the 30th of June 1925.

The resignation was accepted with much regret, and Mrs. Augusta Nascimento was selected and Postmaster in his place, but because the new Postmaster was not prepared to immediately assume the position, Mr. Wilmington continued at that position until the 30th of September 1925, whereupon everything was given into the hands of the new Postmaster, and Mr. Wilmington put aside the Postmaster position which he held for 25 years and 4 months.

Wilmington was chosen as Postmaster for Kalaupapa, Molokai on the 1st of June 1900, and on the 1st of June 1925, he held the position of Postmaster of Kalaupapa for 25 years.

The Post Office of Kalaupapa was constantly rated “Excellent,” the highest rating attainable for a Postmaster for his good, accurate, and respectable carrying out of his work.

During the past great war, while War Stamps were being sold, Kalaupapa was the only Post Office in the Union that was allowed to purchase War Stamps on Credit; all of the other Post Offices were to send in the money first and then receive the Stamps; this showed that Mr. Wilmington had the full trust of his supervisors in the Department.

In the month of July 1916, Wilmington was losing his sight, but he continued at his job until he formally left the position.

KALAUPAPA

(Hoku o Hawaii, 11/10/1925, p. 2)

WAIHO IA OIWI HAWAII I KA OIHANA ME KA MAEMAE

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Buke XIX, Helu 25, Aoao 2. Novemaba 10, 1925.

Rose-colored Kalakaua stamps bought out, 1893.

[Found under: “NU HOU HAWAII.”]

$3,000 was given by Mr. J. J. Egan to the main Post Office in Honolulu this past Saturday, purchasing all of the rose-colored Kalakaua 2 cent stamps. And Mr. Egan will invest in these stamps with the hope that he will meet with good fortune.

[I am assuming he made a killing.]

(Kuokoa, 9/23/1893, p. 3)

$3,000 i hoolilo ia...

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXXII, Helu 38, Aoao 3. Sepatemaba 23, 1893.

Rose-colored Kalakaua 2¢ stamp

Rose-colored Kalakaua 2¢ stamp