A father at Kalaupapa loses a son far away, 1903.

My Beloved Lei, My Child, Has Passed.

Mr. Editor of the newspaper Ke Aloha Aina.

Aloha oe:—May it please your honor to allow me some space of our precious “nupepa” for my bundle of sadness for which the title appears above, so that the friends of my child who live in the wafting Eka wind of that calm land may know.

In the evening of Friday, July 31, 1903, in Kailua, North Kona, Hawaii, the angel of death came to take the soul of my dear son, Jacob Kaleoalii, and he left silently alone on the path of no return, leaving behind his body for his mother and younger siblings to grieve over. Continue reading

Post Brown Bag: “The People of Kalaupapa as Active Participants in Their Own History.” 2012.

Much appreciation goes out to all the good people at the Center for Biographical Research at UHM! And to Anwei Skinsnes Law and Henry Law for their presentation today!! I came out of it feeling upbeat, and excited that there are people out there looking at Hawaiian-Language source material for a window into the past (outside of the University).

I encourage people to go check out the talk, questions and answers, and book signing put on by Native Books from 3 to 5 in the afternoon this Sunday.

Kalaupapa: A Collective Memory

Kalaupapa: A Collective Memory