Newspapers coming out of Lahainaluna School! 1874.

[Found under: “Local News”]

We’ve heard that there are three handwritten newspapers put out by the students of Lahainaluna, named: “Lahainaluna Ponoi,” [Lahainaluna’s Own], “Ka Hoku Kakahiaka,” [The Morning Star], and “Ka Nupepa lawe i na nu hou” [The Newspaper bringing the news]. We offer our praise to the editors of those newspapers, as well as to the entire school.

[It would be a great find if someone had a copy/copies of these newspapers lying around!!]

(Kuokoa 12/5/1874, p. 2)

Ua lohe mai makou...

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XIII, Helu 49, Aoao 2. Dekemaba 5, 1874.

Lahainaluna School news, 1867.

Items from Lahainaluna College.

Crops.—The plants are thriving in front of the school house and the student’s dormitory, as well as in the back; those being: bananas, gourds, and trees as well, such as the pride of India, and kukui, which are all also thriving; it is very pleasant to look at, and the barrenness will perhaps be no more. But this is a considerably new thing.

The sugar cane patch.—The cane patch seems to be growing well, it is on the left side of the road going down to Lahainalalo.

The taro patches.—The teachers and land supervisors are putting effort into working the students in the patches to increase food so that they will not face problems with hunger. The patches being worked are large, and the loi that were not used before are being worked, those being the ones below the river, and the ones above it are starting to be worked (the ones at the school), and the farming is going well, and the taro production will perhaps increase in this upcoming year.

The canal.—The new auwai is being started under the direction of Mr. Andrews. This auwai runs next to the pali, and it’s source is in the district of Auwaiawao; it is called “Pipikapau” and the water will reach the dry patches here above. The students will be truly blessed by this auwai.

The anatomy book (“Anatomia”).—The College is lacking a volume of this type, but it is not totally without, there are a few; although there were a great many in the past years, this year, they are without the printed book, and the second class is being taught from a handwritten book. They are terribly lacking.

Human bones.—On Saturday, the 20th of this month, the second class went to Makaiwa, close to Kekaa, and bags were filled with bones so that they could see the kinds of bones as in Anatomia.

Lantern slides.—Pictures were projected by our instructor, S. E. Bishop, on the night of the 24th of this month in the Church; all the students gathered together, and also there were some of the teachers.
The activities that night were fine.

Joint school.—Every Wednesday, all the grades join together, from the 1st class to the 4th, and the 1st class checks the mistakes in what is written by the other classes in response to the questions given by Andrews. They join together at 10 o’clock on every Wednesday.

The enrollment.—There are 103 students at this school. And Andrews teaches the students at 5 o’clock in the evening every Wednesday, and perhaps the children are acquiring this knowledge.

Break.—The school might go on vacation during the month of December, for a month. This is what we hear from the President, whether it be true or not.

J. Kaohukoloiuka.
Lahainaluna, July 26, 1867.

(Kuokoa, 8/3/1867, p. 3)

Na mea o ke Kulanui o Lahainaluna.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke VI, Helu 31, Aoao 3. Augate 3, 1867.

Woah. This is some story! Hawaiian living abroad comes home to visit… after 38 years. 1915.

THAT HAWAIIAN RETURNS TO SEE HIS HOMELAND ONCE MORE.

JOHN BELL WILSON

After leaving Honolulu thirty-eight years ago, that Hawaiian, John Bell Wilson is his name, returned to see once again his family and homeland while he was still in good health, on the steamship Matsonia this past Wednesday, filled with shock at how the places he was familiar with in his childhood had changed.

John Bell Wilson left Honolulu nei when he was a youngster of twenty-three years in age on a sailboat, because there were few steamships in his day, but it was upon a beautiful steamship that he returned to see the land of his birth and his friends, as he was shocked at the change of Honolulu from an almost nothing town which he left to a beautiful town which one admires.

His eyes met up with new sights of Honolulu and ethnicities which were unfamiliar to him; and as he travelled here and there, there were no friends who he knew in his youth, except for but a few who were still living which he met up with, those friends who he went around with in those days gone by.

Heard of the Death of His Mother

When John Bell Wilson returned to see his homeland, he had one big thing on his mind, that was meeting affectionately with his mother, who he thought was still living, but she was not, and this left him heartbroken.

Mr. Wilson was depressed at the death of his mother, being that from the time he left this land until his return, he did not write his mother; and when he asked his friends when he landed ashore about his mother, this was when he was told she had passed long ago to the other side, three years ago.

He went immediately to find the grave where his mother was laid to rest, and he planned to build a memorial to her, as a show of remembrance from a thoughtless child for his beloved mother.

Not Recognizing Honolulu

According to the words of Mr. Wilson after he saw the scenery unfamiliar to him, he could not recall the old Honolulu, because the town had changed so much from when he left, however he did have recollections of the major streets of town.

When he travelled about looking here and there, those scenes were not familiar to him, except for just a few people who went around with him and played with him in the days of his childhood. The small children he left behind were now very elderly and some of them had white hair.

Some of the familiar people who he saw on the first day he

(See page four.)

(Kuokoa, 2/5/1915, p. 1)

HULI HOI MAI IA KANAKA HAWAII E IKE HOU I KA AINA HANAU

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LIII, Helu 6, Aoao 1. Feberuari 5, 1915.

RETURNED TO THE HOMELAND

(From page one.)

stepped once again on the soil of Hawaii, were J. K. Kamanoulu and East Kahulualii who work at the newspaper printing office.

In the days of his childhood, he went often to the old Kaumakapili Church, and he was enrolled at Lahainaluna School, and according to him, C. P. Iaukea is one of his friends who is still living.

Became Wealthy in a Foreign Land

When he left the land of his birth, he got off at Sutter County, California, and there he sought very hard until he became well off.

He married his wife, and they currently have five grown children, and he provided a good home for his family. He is the one who supplies the market of Sacramento with fish and meat, and he also makes profits from the farming industry.

Kalakaua was the King of Hawaii nei at the time he last saw Hawaii, and Lorrin A. Thurston was but a child.

There are many people from Hawaii who have met up with him in California, and in the year 1891, in the town of San Francisco, he met with King Kalakaua there, and they dined together, drank and talked, and just a few days after that was when King Kalakaua died.

Did Not Forget His Mother Tongue

Mr. Wilson is now sixty-one years old, so he was living thirty-eight years abroad, and he has not forgotten his native language, he is still fluent in Hawaiian, just as the people here are.

According to him, he will spend three months staying in Hawaii before returning to his family who await him.

(Kuokoa 2/5/1915, p. 4)

HULI HOI MAI I KA AINA HANAU

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LIII, Helu 6, Aoao 4. Feberuari 5, 1915.