One more on the Hawaiian Flag issue of the Kuokoa. 1862.

THE KUOKOA.—The number of this native paper for January 1st, appeared on the last day of December, and was warmly greeted by the native population who are in ecstacies over it. Indeed they have good cause, for as a specimen of the typographic art, it will compare favorably with any paper published anywhere in the world; and this in a land which forty years ago was peopled by savages. Surely they cannot now complain of a want of good newspapers and plenty of news; and we judge they value the Kuokoa, for they pay in their subscriptions for it with a cheerfulness and promptness not exceeded by foreigners. In order that our subscribers who are not versed in the language may have some idea of its contents, we will state here what they are:

1st page.—Song to the New Year,

Items of Foreign News,

The Hawaiian flag, with its history and a song.

Account of one of the Battles of Napoleon I.

2d page.—Editorial, Circuit Court Report, Local News.

A song to the Kuokoa.

3d page.—Communications, Meles, Price Current,

Marine Record, Births, Marriages and Deaths,

Almanac and Advertisements.

4th page.—Late Foreign News, including war news,

The Mexican troubles and threatened invasion by Spain, &c.

Daring Exploit of Capt. Strong.

Arrest of the Rebel Commissioners Mason and Slidell.

A Lamentation to Mrs. Martha Ii.

Advertisements, &c., &c.

The above will give an idea of the contents and matter of the native paper. But to appreciate the change from the old style of newspapers prepared for them, foreigners will have to read for themselves. Some of the communications are as keen, sharp-witted and sarcastic as any productions in English, while some few of their meles or lamentations, abound in illustrations of poetic beauty and thought. The lamentation to Mrs. Ii, on the fourth page of that paper, written by her brother at Hilo, is such. The Hawaiian flag printed in colors, and the new heading, attract general attention. The paper will serve as a curiosity to send abroad, and we notice that many are procuring copies for mailing. It will do more to give our nation and flag a notoriety abroad, then a dozen of Mr. Wyllie’s proclamations of neutrality.

[There actually was a replica done of this issue of the Kuokoa by Hoolaupai: Hawaiian Newspaper Resource (which currently either lies dormant or has gone defunct). I heard word that it was going to be reprinted once again a number of months ago, but it seems that did not happen…]

(Pacific Commercial Advertiser, 1/2/1862, p. 2)

The Kuokoa.

The Pacific Commercial Advertiser, Volume VI, Number 27, Page 2. January 2, 1862.

More on the Hawaiian Flag in the Kuokoa. 1861.

A BEAUTIFUL NUMBER.—The next issue of the native newspaper Kuokoa—the number for January 1, 1862,—which will appear on Monday next, will be ornamented with the HAWAIIAN FLAG, printed in colors—red, white and blue. As printed, it will afford a specimen of the typographic art, seldom seen in any country, and will be a curiosity worth mailing abroad. Indeed, we have never seen a national flag worked off in three colors in a newspaper. When to this we add, that the engravings were made and all the printing done by native Hawaiians, those who see the paper, with the Hawaiian Standard floating in it in colors, will participate with us in the pride we feel at the successful execution of this difficult job. The name of the young man, to whom we are mostly indebted for the engraving and successful completion of this word, is JAMES AULD, a Hawaiian, who has served his apprenticeship in our office.

—The Kuokoa is rapidly increasing in popularity with the natives, and now numbers nearly 3,000 subscribers. The present edition is about 3,500 copies. Copies can be had for 12½ cents each.

[The added information of James Auld here shows that it is important to not only get information from the Hawaiian-Language Newspapers, but the other language papers hold good information as well!]

(Pacific Commercial Advertiser, 12/26/1861, p. 2)

A Beautiful Number.

The Pacific Commercial Advertiser. Volume VI, Number 26, Page 2. December 26, 1861.