One more on the passing of Ioane Ukeke, 1903.

IOANE UKEKE HAS DIED.

Last Friday, Ioane Ukeke left this life, he was one of the old-time kamaaina of the Kukalahale Rain [famous rain of Honolulu], and he was a skilled expert at teaching hula and playing the ukeke in the days gone by, and it is because of Ioane’s skill at playing the ukeke that he received the nickname “Ioane Ukeke.” During the reign of King Kalakaua, he was a hula teacher [kumuao hula] in the royal court, but what made him famous was his showing off in costume, and there was many a time when foreigners mistook him for a prince when he passed by the street corner [huna alanui? huina alanui?] in his stylish attire and his silk waist [pakana ?] and velvet slacks with his beaver hat and monocle, with his short cane. Those proud days of Ioane have gone with the flow of time. He faced difficulties in his latter days, because of blindness. He was always seen on Fort Street with his favorite ukeke serenading those passing by before him, and those who felt aloha for this blind man would undo the tie of aloha and gave a helping hand to the impaired one. Aloha for him.

(Aloha Aina, 5/9/1903, p. 6)

MAKE O IOANE UKEKE.

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke IX, Helu 19, Aoao 6. Mei 9, 1903.

Famed Dandy, Ioane Ukeke, is no more. 1903.

His Joyous Voice is Gone.

On Friday of this past week [5/1/1903], Ioane Ukeke died, and with his death, so too has one of the famous people of thirty or forty years ago left. Those days, Ioane was seen on the streets of town in full attire of a gentleman, and he was often mistaken by the foreign haole, as a prince of the land; but these past years, he went blind, and he was seen on the street sides playing the ukeke and sticking out his hat this way and that for some coins given charitably by the passersby.

Ioane is very famous in Hawaii for his playing of the ukeke. In his youth, he was a hula teacher [a’o hula], and he often went before the court of the alii as a hula leader [poo hula ?]. In those days, Ioane was seen on the streets in a velvet suit, beaver hat, glasses and a cane; he was called “Dandy” by the haole.

(Kuokoa, 5/8/1903, p. 6)

Ua Nalohia Kona Leo Uhene.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLI, Helu 19, Aoao 6. Mei 8, 1903.

Lava destroys the village of Hoopuloa, Kona. 1926.

The Harbor of Hoopuloa is Destroyed by Lava.

On this past Sunday [4/18/1926], the fire of woman of Mokuaweoweo appeared and reached the sea and it swept aside the things blocking its path. When it got close to the upland of Hoopuloa, the flow of lava separated into two, and one of the flows went straight for the village of Hoopuloa and the harbor, and the second flow went towards the village of Milolii. The fiery lava engulfed the harbor and village of Hoopuloa, and now they are but a heap of pahoehoe lava.

According to eyewitnesses of this engulfing lava, it was frightening seeing the lava coming down, and others say that it was truly awesome watching the flowing lava and its sweeping aside of all obstructions in its path.

The last word heard before the the Hoku went to the press was that this Wondrous Woman of Halemaumau returned to her Palace at Kilauea, and she is bringing to life her fires at the famed crater of Halemaumau.

Perhaps her rage has been quenched as the skin of that woman has touched the sea, but the memory of the tragedy which befell the people of that section of Kona is heartbreaking.

[And check out this awesome picture of the tragic event taken by Tai Sing Loo, put up by the Hawaiian Historical Society!]

(Hoku o Hawaii, 4/20/1926, p. 2)

Pau ka Uwapo o Hoopuloa i ke Ahi Pele

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Buke XIX, Helu 48, Aoao 2. Aperila 20, 1926.

Kuhio and the Hawaiian Civic Clubs. 1918.

THE PARTY OF HAWAIIANS  WAS FILLED WITH ENTHUSIASM

Hawaiians Gathered at the Young Hotel at the Invitation of Prince Kalanianaole

HEARD WAS IDEAS FOR UNIFICATION

Desired that Hawaiians Stand Together as a People

On the sixth floor of the Young Hotel, at noon this past Tuesday, the Hawaiians of this town gathered for the first time, for a luncheon amid enthusiasm and joy, and this will be a regular thing, like the haole regularly meet at noon on Wednesdays.

This was a meeting organized by Prince Kalanianaole, and Hawaiians of good standing who live here in town were invited to attend, without attention being paid to political affiliation; it is true, many Hawaiians came, and the total number was about seventy-one; and being that this is just the beginning, it will be more full in the future, should this gathering at lunch become a regular thing.

At this meeting was Prince Kalanianaole, the chairman of this meeting and luncheon, and also Mayor Fern, Circuit Judge Heen, Rev. Akaiko Akana, Senators John H. Wise and Charles E. King, Representative Kumalae, Sheriff Charles H. Rose, and some other Hawaiian leaders of town; and everyone gathered there that afternoon seemed spirited to stand shoulder to shoulder, chest to chest, in all things; to lift this lahui from the low level to be equal with the other ethnicities in all aspects.

In order to move forward the agenda for which the Hawaiians gathered at that luncheon, Prince Kalanianaole explained that he greatly wished that the Hawaiian people would think as one, and as a means to that ends, he believes that meeting together in one place by holding regular luncheons of that sort, is where you’d discuss things and hear explanation from different people on all questions regarding the well-being of Hawaiians.

“The great problem seen amongst us, as a people,” according to him, is that we don’t cooperate; we all stand independently, and when we want good works to be done, it is very hard to accomplish for we lack unity and strength.

“Unifying ourselves, and listening to people talk about things that will benefit this lahui is very important for the perpetuation of the lahui; and as we gather regularly at meals of this sort, we will become familiar with each other, and we will hear ideas that should be carried out, and we will be seen as a lahui.”

Some time was spent by Prince Kalanianaole explaining the goals of that gathering while his speech was encouraged by applause, then he called up Circuit Judge Heen to give a few words of clarification before the crowd.

According to him, he was not prepared with a clear topic to talk about, however, he was in agreement with Prince Kalanianaole; all Hawaiians must stand together and work as one in all endeavors that will better themselves as a lahui.

J. Ordenstein, John H. Wise, Charles Achi, Jr., Fred Beckley, Charles E. King, Charles Dwight, Mayor Fern, and Rev. Akaiko Akana were called to explain their overall thoughts as to what is to be done to benefit Hawaiians from here forth.

Rev. Akaiko Akana shared his thoughts; when Hawaiians go back to their traditional occupations [?] and cherish their way of life, that is the only way Hawaiians will be blessed.

The big problem with this lahui, according to him, is the lack of knowledge and readiness to go into business for themselves and so too with being economical; when these important things are acquired by Hawaiians, they will be able to climb to a high level.

Mr. Wise and Mayor Fern were some who spoke of their ideas on the question of leasing a building [?], and their ideas were heard with much enthusiasm.

Before the meeting was adjourned, one idea was approved, to draft a constitution for a club, and to place it in the hands of a committee to lay out the foundation and mission that this association of Hawaiians would carry out.

(Kuokoa, 11/29/1918, p. 1)

PIHA OHOHIA KA PAINA A NA KANAKA HAWAII

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LVI, Helu 48, Aoao 1. Novemaba 29, 1918.