Early movie making in Honolulu, 1913.

FAKE MOVIE.

Last Saturday, on Bethel Street, a scene was put on for movie makers, which became something unappealing to some who witnessed it.

There was a Hawaiian girl set aside for the shooting that went and stood outside the entrance of a bar, and at this was when a drunk man exited and clutched the girl, while the one with the camera continued to film.

As the drunkard continued to grasp the girl, a sailor came and rescued the girl, and he punched the drunk man, who fell down as blood flowed.

This was a movie meant to show a Honolulu scene before the public, even if that type of scene is not something seen regularly in this town.

According to those who witnessed this, it was nothing but acting; the one who went and grabbed the girl was not really drunk, and he was not hit with a real punch, also, it was not real blood that flowed on the street, but it was something red that resembled blood.

One of those who saw this being staged said that this kind of thing should be prohibited, and those who own movie cameras should be licensed, and those who break the law should have their licenses revoked for good.

(Kuokoa, 1/10/1913, p. 4)

HE KII ONIONI HOOMEAMEA.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLIX, Helu 2, Aoao 4. Ianuari 10, 1913.

Free admission at the Museum in honor of Pauahi’s birthday! 2012.

BISHOP MUSEUM CELEBRATES PRINCESS BERNICE PAUAHI BISHOP’S BIRTHDAY
WITH FREE ADMISSION FOR KAMA ‘ĀINA AND MILITARY

HONOLULU — Bishop Museum is celebrating Bernice Pauahi Bishop’s birthday a few days early — on Sunday, Dec. 16, 2012—with free admission to the museum all day for kama‘āina and military with valid identification. Regular admission rates will apply to the general public. A special program will take place from noon to 1 p.m. and will feature oli (chant), hula, and mele (song) by Bishop Museum staff and the Kamehameha Alumni Glee Club.

For the whole story, go here.