And yet another on Liliu and the Red Cross, 1917.

Red Cross Flag, Gift of Queen, Flies From Hawaii’s Capitol

Governor Presents Emblem On Behalf of Liliuokalani

Governor Pinkham presenting Red Cross flag this morning. Col. Iaukea, the queen’s secretary, is seen holding the flag.

‘LET ALL WHO SEE IT BE REMINDED OF PATRIOTIC DUTY’ SAYS HER MAJESTY

FOR the first time in history a Red Cross flag was raised today over the territorial capitol, former palace of Hawaii. The flag is the gift of Queen Liliuokalani, and it was at her request that it was first displayed from the staff on the executive building.

In an impressive ceremony held at 10 o’clock this morning Governor Pinkham presented the flag on behalf of the Queen to the Allied War Relief Auxiliary and the Red Cross workers of Hawaii.

Mrs. Henry F. Damon, president of the auxiliary, received the flag and hoisted it to the breezes. The ceremony was held on the mauka steps of the capitol, fully 50 women and a number of men gathering for it. A generous clapping of hands greeted the banner as it opened against a clear background of blue sky and in the bright gleam of a morning sun.

After reading the queen’s letter, in which she presented the flag to the Red Cross workers, Governor Pinkham said:

“Women of the Red Cross:

“You are gathered here to receive from Her Majesty Ex-Queen Liliuokalani, her gift of the emblem of Universal Humanity, that you may raise it above your labors in behalf of those your countrymen and their allies, who with devotion to the very limit of suffering and death, offer themselves in this struggle for universal democracy.

“Your work of alleviation of suffering has touched the heart of Her Majesty and those in authority from the President of the United STates to those on her own island home and her friends, who now know of her deep personal interest, for it has been manifested in every way within her power.

“With the words she has personally caused to be recorded, I in her behalf, present you with the banner of the Red Cross, which you are to place high above the capitol, that all may recognize the place of your merciful and patriotic labors, and the deep heartfelt sympathy and practical assistance of Her Majesty, Liliuokalani.”

Col. C. P. Iaukea, secretary of the queen, then handed over the big banner to Mrs. Damon, who received it on behalf of her coworkers.

“It is a great honor to receive this flag on behalf of the Allied War Relief Auxiliary and the Red Cross workers of Hawaii,” said Mrs. Damon. We wish to thank you, Governor Pinkham, for letting it be displayed on the executive building as a symbol of loyalty and service to the cause of America.

“In 1864 fourteen governments and six societies acknowledged the Red Cross flag as an emblem to be used in the care of the sick and wounded, and the flag is now displayed by all nations and societies as token of this. The first Red Cross banner was raised in 1881 at Washington, District of Columbia, and in 1900 by congressional act was given official recognition.”

When Mrs. Damon had finished the flag was placed on the halyards and she raised it so that the breezes caught and unfolded it in the sunlight. After today it will be taken down and kept in the throne room as a token of Queen Liliuokalani’s generous heartedness.

Beginning today the throne room in the capitol building will be kept open on Friday afternoons to give opportunity for service to those women who cannot come for Red Cross work in the mornings.

Mrs. Henry F. Damon of the Allied War Relief Auxiliary said today that this is in the nature of an experiment and will be kept up only if the attendance on Friday afternoons warrants it. There have been a number of requests to keep the rooms open during some afternoons, and Friday has accordingly been selected.

THE QUEEN’S LETTER

Hon. Lucius E. Pinkham,

Governor of Hawaii.

Dear Sir: It affords me much pleasure in handing you a Red Cross flag, with the request that it be presented to the ladies of the Allied War Relief Auxiliary of the Honolulu, Hawaii, Chapter of the American Red Cross, as an expression of my warm and hearty sympathy with the cause of humanity and an abiding faith in the work of the patriotic women of Hawaii.

In presenting this emblem of the Red Cross, may I suggest that it be first displayed over the executive building so that all who may see it may be reminded of their patriotic duty and know that beneath its folds, in the throne room of Iolani palace, sit a group of silent workers giving of their time and untiring effort in the work of alleviation and mercy?

Very sincerely,

(Signed) LILIUOKALANI.

(Honolulu Star-Bulletin, 9/14/1917, p. 3)

Red Cross Flag, Gift of Queen, Flies From Hawaii's Capitol

Honolulu Star-Bulletin, Volume XXV, Number 7932, Page 3. September 14, 1917.

More on Queen Liliuokalani and the Red Cross, 1917.

Liliuokalani Becomes Red Cross Member As Whistles Signify 8000 Mark Is Reached

Queen Liliuokalani receiving a Red Cross card from Mrs. Gerrit Wilder after her contribution of a $100 check to the fund.

Her Majesty Queen Liliuokalani today became a patron member of the American Red Cross.

Seated in her wheel chair on the broad lanai of her home at Washington Place she handed over to Mrs. Gerrit Wilder, chairman of Division No. 1, the hundred dollar check which gave her patron membership in the national organization. Mrs. Wilder in turn placed one of the little Red Cross cards in the venerable lady’s hands and thanked her for the generous gift.

“It is with the deepest appreciation that I accept this gift from you on behalf of the Red Cross,” said Mrs. Wilder. “This is another of your many deeds of kindness and generosity.”

Queen Liliuokalani bowed gently and a sweet smile came over her face. She spoke a word or two in answer, turning to Mrs. Wilder and to Mrs. William Todd and Mrs. E. White Sutton, the other member of the visiting committee.

Curtins P. Iaukea, the queen’s secretary, pointed to the card which she held, telling her that she was now a member of the organization for which it stood. People all over the city are giving to this cause, he said.

Just then another of the whistles that were announcing the swiftly increasing subscriptions began to blow. Col. Iaukea inquired and was told that this was the whistle signifying 8000 had been reached.

“That is 8000 now,” said the secretary. “Eight thousand members this morning.”

“Eight thousand,” said the queen, pronouncing the words slowly and distinctly, and her face lighted.

“And you are the eight thousandth,” Col. Iaukea told her.

Queen Liliuokalani was gowned this morning in black, with a small white shawl over her shoulders. About her neck was a beautiful pink and white lei of flowers, while a crown-shaped comb held her white hair.

(Honolulu Star-Bulletin, 9/29/1917, p. 2)

Liliuokalani Becomes Red Cross Member As Whistles Signify 8000 Mark Is Reached

Honolulu Star-Bulletin, Volume XXV, Number 7945, Page 2. September 29, 1917.