More coverage of Hui Nalu Singing Group, 1912.

THE HUI HIMENI HUI NALU IS HEADED TO CHINA

To fulfill their contract with the head of the Carlton Cafe, Mr. L. Ladow, in Shanghai, China, the singing boys of the Hui Nalu will leave aboard the Tenyo Maru yesterday, and they will spend a long period of time there before returning to Hawaii nei.

They were supposed to leave this town on Monday, however because what was planned earlier did not go well, their trip to foreign lands has been postponed for a bit.

There are five of these singers, they being: Alex. Holstein, Willie Opunui, James K. Ii, Jr., Peter Opunui, and William Punohu.

(Kuokoa, 12/20/1912, p. 4)

E HOLO ANA KA HUI HIMENI HUI NALU NO KINA

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLVIII, Helu 51, Aoao 4. Dekemaba 20, 1912.

Musicians travel to Japan and China, 1912.

Those Hawaiian Singers Leave for the East.

These youths are from the Hui Nalu [Singing Club] who left for the East; and they will visit Japan and Shanghai in China and other locations in the East.

They will leave the land of their birth aboard the steamship Tenyo Maru [?], and they left this day, their names being:

Alexander Holstein, baritone,

William Opunui, tenor, James K. Ii, Jr., tenor, Peter Opunui, violin, William Punohu, bass, and L. Ladon [Louis Ladow] the head of the Carlton Cafe, where they are to perform.

Our hope is that the journey of these Hawaii boys carrying with them the pride of Hawaii to East, to the land of the rising Sun, goes well. Go forward, go forward O Great-Travelling Hawaiians and return with glory in the name of Hawaii.

(Kuokoa Home Rula, 12/19/1912, p. 1)

Hala aku la ia poe Hawaii Himeni no ka Hikina

Kuokoa Home Rula, Buke X, Helu 51, Aoao 1. Dekemaba 19, 1912.

Smuggled goods, 1912.

SMUGGLED GOODS AUCTIONED OFF

In three hours or so this past Tuesday, items attempted to be smuggled in without paying Duty were auctioned off on Fort Street. Japanese Silk goods made $1,740.00 whereas the actual value of the items is believed to be only $1,100.00 according to the person who imported them; and so it was much more than the real value, being that it was $640.00. There were 600 items that were auctioned and the majority was silk goods. The auction began at 10 a. m. and closed at 1 p. m.; there were many Japanese who showed up.

(Kuokoa Home Rula, 12/19/1912, p. 1)

NA WAIWAI HOOPAE MALU PAU I KE KUDALA

Kuokoa Home Rula, Buke X, Helu 51, Aoao 1. Dekemaba 19, 1912.