E o, e Kaleleonalani! Queen Emma and Kamehameha Schools, 1887.

KAMEHAMEHA SCHOOL.

The gates of the Kamehameha School for boys will open in October of this current year. The imperfections of one of the dormitories of 30 x 64 [feet] are almost smoothed out, and another was complete before. These dormitories are two storied, bottom floor and top floor, and each of them have 24 rooms of 8 x 12, and a hallway [keena waena loloa]. One room of each house is furnished with facilities to wash up and clean, and the rest of the rooms are bedrooms, each being supplied with a iron bed, desk, chair, closet, and some other furnishings. The rooms are clean and lighted, and well-furnished for the student.

The dining hall of 29 x 81 feet is a separate building, and it is 18 feet from the bottom to the ceiling, and it will fit two-hundred people. A stone building will be built behind this, which will be the kitchen and and a place to store the food and all cookware and dinnerware.

A proper schoolhouse will be built after the buildings that are desired to be completed quickly are done, and in the meantime, parts of the dining hall will be set aside as school rooms.

A clear spring will supply the school with water and it is by steam pumps that the water will be brought up and filled into a separate water tank, and from there into many pipes laid all over the grounds and buildings.

The curriculum at this school teaches thoroughly the branches of the English language; and outside of that are the teaching of industrial arts. Some rooms of the school house will be set aside as rooms for carpentry, printing, tailoring, blacksmithing, and masonry. The instruction will take place under the direction of a mechanic [mekanika]. Some time will also be set aside for military drilling, physical development, and so forth.

There are fun and cheerful activities for the students. This school sits on a serene site, living there is pleasant, and it is separated from the town of Honolulu.

In a section of this paper, the reader will see the advertisement dealing with this School. This is the educating home established for the benefit of Hawaii’s children who seek education, and built by way of the estate of the late Dowager Queen Ema Kaleleonalani. This home stands in the plain of Kaiwiula in Kalihi, and it is near completion. On the first Tuesday of October 1887, this school will open to students.

It has been heard that the assets of the school will be increased for the good of the children, and for now, parents who want their children to progress forward are being urged to rush to this new home where knowledge is increased. Much benefits will be gained if patient and if the aloha of the royal parent Ema Kaleleonalani is held resolute as well by Hawaii’s children, the one who left this great gift behind. Look at its published notice.

[On this, the day after Queen Emma’s 177th birthday, i thought it would be a good thingĀ  to look back at her role in the establishment of the Kamehameha Schools, a role which she is not recognized often for today.

Notice the difference between the article appearing in the May 24th edition of the Hawaiian Gazette, “The Kamehameha Schools.” (probably what the article is based upon) and this Hawaiian-Language article.]

(Kuokoa, 5/28/1887, p. 2)

KE KULA KAMEHAMEHA.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXVI, Helu 22, Aoao 2. Mei 28, 1887.