Jules Verne’s famous story to be told, 1875.

A NEW TALE

—ABOUT THE—

STRANGE THINGS OF THE SEA.

On the 2nd of the coming October, we will begin to publish a brand new story written by the famous French Novelist, Jules Verne, called—”Twenty-Thousand Leagues Under the Sea,” which tells of the strange scenes of peoples of the sea and shipwrecks, and so forth. Continue reading

Maika, the half Indian, half Hawaiian, 1892–1893.

THE REMARKABLE ENTERTAINMENT

—ABOUT—

MAIKA

THE BOY THAT WAS

Half Indian and

Half Hawaiian.

THE FIRST MAN TO SHOOT THE BEAR GOD GREATLY FEARED BY THE INDIANS—AS WELL AS THE TERROR OF THE WHITE SKINS–AND THE MASSACRE OF THE THEATRICAL GROUP OF LEE.

When the first brown skins were first contracted on Whaling ships, a man named Akamai boarded and their ship left for the Arctic [Atika] where that kind of huge fish lives to this day, that being the Whale [Kohola].

When their ship was let go in fair winds, and in the middle of the night, while everyone was enjoying their sleep, there was one of them awake then, that being the man who was bent over the oar of that ark of theirs.

While he was crouched over the oar of their ark, that little ship of theirs came upon a storm, and all the gear was blown away by the wind and the masts were snapped and the oars were broken; and because of this storm they ran into, they couldn’t do a thing; all they could do was to sit calmly looking out for land or a ship to save their lives.

While they waited for their end, and when the rays of the sun burst forth, their souls were gladdened to see that they had landed on land; they jumped off to land, and wandered about here and there, and as they wandered around…

[And so begins the amazing story of the hapa Ilikini, hapa Hawaii, named Maika. It runs in the newspaper Leo o ka Lahui (a daily, Mondays to Fridays) from 11/21/1892, and the last installment is found on 6/12/1893.]

(Leo o ka Lahui, 11/21/1892, p. 1)

HE NANEA KAMAHAO NO MAIKA

Ka Leo o ka Lahui, Buke II, Helu 586, Aoao 1. Novemaba 21, 1892.

The story of Kana, from William Hyde Rice, 1908.

A STORY

ABOUT

KANA, THE ROPE GRANDSON OF ULI

THE EXPERT OF HAWAII, AND THE MYSTERIOUS ONE WHO LOWERED THE FAMOUS PEAK OF HAUPU WHICH REACHED INTO THE HEAVENS—THE ONE WHO ALSO FETCHED THE SUN AT KUKULU O KAHIKI.

Hookaakaa ka Lani
Kakaa ka Iloli
Wehiwehi ka Mauna
Palamoa ka Opua

E Kana—e
Hina ia i o Uli ala
Ko Kupunawahine.
* ∗ * ∗ * ∗

[The Heavens Turn
Rolling are the pangs of pregnancy
Bedecked are the mountains
Dense are the clouds

O Kana
It is Hina and Uli is there
Your Grandmother.
* ∗ * ∗ * ∗]

(By the kindness of Hon. W. H. Rice of the Island Sun-Snatching Island.)

Uli (f) dwelt with Ku (m), born was Hakalani-leo (f), and she was called another name, Kuahuula. Kuahuula (f) dwelt with Haka (m), born was Kukahikapo (m), Halekamakamaole (m), Kuluakapo (m), Kukolukapo (m), Hanalolo (m), Ouwaikaaha (m), Paukukaula (m), Awepumaia (m), Kaeekowali (m), Pinawelewele (m), Niheu (m) and Kana. Uli (f) was born in Hilo, Hawaii, and she had a number of siblings. Manu (m) is from below in Milu, and Wakea (m) is from below in Papanuihanaumoku. They were high chiefs. Uli’s work was planting all growing things and making kapa. Continue reading

Kawelo story by S. K. Kawailiula, 1861.

Story of Kawelo.

Maihuna was the kane and Malaiakalani his wahine; the two of them lived in Hanamaulu on Kauai. Malaiakalani was with child and gave birth to a son, and they called their first born, Kawelomahamahaia; and they were with child once again, and Kaweloikiakoo was born, and after him was born a daughter, and she was called Kaenakuokalani, and after her was born Kawelo, and called Kaweloleimakua, and he is the one who this moolelo is about, and after him was born Kamalama, their youngest sibling, and that was the last of their generation.

[This is how the moolelo of Kawelo written by S. K. Kawailiula starts off. This telling appears in Ka Hoku o ka Pakipika from 9/26/1861 to 12/5/1861.]

(Hoku o ka Pakipika, 9/26/1861, p. 1)

Mooolelo no Kawelo.

Ka Hoku o ka Pakipika, Buke I, Helu 1, Aoao 1. Sepatemaba 26, 1861.

Kawelo story, 1909 / 2009.

The Great Story

OF

KAWELO

The Foremost and the Powerful, the One Who Put
Down the Strength of Kauahoa, the Youthful Hero of Hanalei;

TO WHOM BELONGED THE FAMOUS CLUB KUIKAA,
AND HIS WAS THE TRIPPING CLUB-WIELDING WIFE,
KANEWAHINEIKIAOHA

The writer of this Moolelo gives first his New Year Aloha to the friends and companions of the Pride of the Nation [Ke Kuokoa Home Rula], before putting before them a short explanation about things pertaining to this story. Continue reading

Story of Kawelo, 1908–1909.

THE STORY

OF

KAWELO

THE FIERCE FIGHTER OF KAUAI

AND THE OPPONENT OF

KAUAHOA

The Handsome Youthful Hero of Hanalei

“E Kawelo-lei-makua, e pae,
E Kamahana a ka lapa o Puna,
Na maka o Halona iluna,
Kuu haku, kuu lawaia alii o Kauai.”

[O Kaweloleimakua, land,
O Kamahana of the ridges of Puna
The eyes of Halona above,
My lord, my fishing chief of Kauai.]

Maihuna is the father, Malaiakalani is the mother, Hanamaulu is the land of birth of Kawelo.

There are five in Kawelo’s generation, the first being Kawelomahamahaia, followed by Kaweloleikoo, both boys; following was born Kaenakuakalani, a female, and after her was Kaweloleimakua, the one who this moolelo is about, and after him was Kamalama, the beloved younger sibling of Kawelo…

[This is how the moolelo of Kawelo begins as it appears in the Hilo newspaper, Hoku o Hawaii. The story runs from 12/31/1908 to 3/25/1909, and is not attributed to a given writer, however, looking at the other moolelo in the newspaper published around the same time, it is probably submitted by William Hyde Rice.]

(Hoku o Hawaii, 12/31/1908, p. 1)

HE MOOLELO NO KAWELO

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Buke III, Helu 36, Aoao 1. Dekemaba 31, 1908.