Remembering Jules Dudoit, 1866.

The Late Julius Dudoit, Esq.

Seldom does the historian of passing events have a sadder task to perform than when penning obituary notices of his contemporaries; but when the subject of his notice is a person of mark,—of innocent and upright character,—the victim of a dastardly assassin; it becomes a melancholy duty to lay a last mark of esteem upon the tomb of the outraged, especially when venerable for age, and honorable for past services. Continue reading

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Horrifying death of Kuakua, 1866.

A Horrifying Death.—The previous night of Friday, there was a dastardly deed, something very frightening, in the uplands of Maemae. It would seem that in the middle of the night, someone familiar with the house went in and attacked Jules Dudoit, Esq. (Kuakua the one who was teaching people seafaring) until dead. That person also attacked the wife as well, but did not carry out his intent upon her. It is believed however that the wife will not survive and the two will perish at the heartless oppressive hands of the murdered. Continue reading

Lorrin Andrews’ Hawaiian language dictionary, 1862.

Kumu Olelo Hawaii.

We are thrilled to hear that the Hawaiian Language Manual being assembled by the esteemed L. Andrews [ka mea Mahaloia L. Aneru]. It is a Book that explains the essence of words, like the haole; only the letter P remains, and then it is finished. There was a great resolution by the Legislature to set aside funds for this endeavor; but not a penny has been given by the Government Treasury. It can be made ready for printing should there be a skilled Hawaiian, and if there is not, it will take about three months before it can be printed. And now, there are many haole who want to know the Hawaiian language; and so too of the Hawaiians, they want to know English; therefore, we believe that it is appropriate that the money is spent on this. Continue reading