More on the malihini, Joseph Rock, 1916.

COLLEGE BOTANIST RETURNS TOMORROW

Prof. Joseph F. Rock, head of the botany department at the College of Hawaii and author of the book, “Indigenous Trees of the Hawaiian Islands,” will return to Honolulu tomorrow on the Shinyo Maru, according to advices that have been received here.

During the summer months the professor has been in the islands of Java and Sumatra and in the Philippines collecting specimens and doing research work in his line. He left here about the middle of June.

(Honolulu Star Bulletin, 9/4/1916, p. 3)

COLLEGE BOTANIST RETURNS TOMORROW

The Honolulu Star-Bulletin, Volume XXIV, Number 7612, Page 3. September 4, 1916.

Another Hawaiian goes to war abroad, 1917.

[Found under: “Nuhou Kuloko”]

Moses Puahi Keoua, the engineer for the prison, received a letter from his son, Peter Moses Keoua, who left Hawaii nei about two months ago, which told of his enlisting into the British military in Canada; he is staying at the military base in Winnipeg until the government calls those troops to the battlefield.

(Aloha Aina, 11/2/1917, p. 4)

Ua loaa mai he leka...

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke XXII, Helu 44, Aoao 4. Novemaba 2, 1917.

 

Swim to be held at Punahou, 1922.

A Scene from Preparations for a Swim at Punahou

The picture above [below], beginning from the left is of Duke P. Kahanamoku, the world champion swimmer, Mrs. David Wark Griffith, Oscar Henning, the manager of Kahanamoku, and Dad Center. Mr. Kahanamoku entered into a contract for him to perform some astonishing feats to be made into a movie under the direction of Mr. Henning for the success of that endeavor, and it is believed that a company will be started here to produce Kahanamoku’s movies.

(Kuokoa, 2/10/1922, p. 5)

He Hiona no ka Hoolalaia Ana o Kahi Auau ma Punahou

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LXI, Helu 6, Aoao 5. Feberuari 10, 1922.

Alexander Liholiho is proclaimed Kamehameha IV, 1854.

PROCLAMATION.

Whereas, it has pleased Almighty God to remove from this world our beloved Sovereign, His Late Majesty, Kamehameha III; and whereas, by the Will of His late Majesty, and by the appointment and Proclamation of His Majesty and of the House of Nobles, His Royal Highness, Prince Liholiho, was declared to be His Majesty’s Successor. Therefore, Public Proclamation is hereby made, that Prince Alexander Liholiho is KING of the Hawaiian Islands, under the style of KAMEHAMEHA IV. God Preserve the King.

KEONI ANA,

Kuhina Nui.

(Polynesian, 12/16/1854, p. 2)

PROCLAMATION.

The Polynesian, Volume XI, Number 32, Page 2. December 16, 1854.

Alexander Liholiho becomes Kamehameha IV, 1854.

OLELO HOOLAHA.

NO KA MEA ua lawe aku ke Akua ola mau loa, mai keia ao aku, i ka MOI KAMEHAMEHA III, ko kakou alii aloha mamua iho nei; no ka mea hoi, mamuli o ke kauoha a ka MOI mamua iho nei a mamuli hoi o ka olelo hooholo a me ka Olelo Hoolaha a ka MOI a me ka Halealii ua kukala ia ka Mea Kiekie Liholiho, oia kona hope;

Nolaila, ke hoolahaia nei ma keia olelo, o ke Alii Alexander Liholiho, oia ka MOI o ko Hawaii pae aina, a o kona inoa alii, o KAMEHAMEHA IV. Na ke Akua e malama ke Alii.

KEONI ANA,

Kuhina Nui.

(Polynesian, 12/16/1854, p. 2)

OLELO HOOLAHA.

The Polynesian, Volume XI, Number 32, Page 2. December 16, 1854.

Kauikeaouli, Kamehameha III, dies a hundred and sixty years ago, 1854.

DEATH OF THE KING!

KAMEHAMEHA IV PROCLAIMED.

After a serious illness of five or six days, His Majesty, Kamehameha III, expired at His Palace on Friday, Dec. 15th, at fifteen minutes before 12 o’clock. He was born on the 17th of March, 1813, and was consequently forty-one years and nine months old.

This painful event was immediately made known by hoisting the Royal and National Standards at half mast, and by the firing of minute guns, corresponding with the age of his late Majesty, from Punch Bowl battery.

As soon as the news spread, the flags on shore and afloat were all set at half mast, and places of business were closed. Large numbers of people assembled near the palace and testified their grief by loud and heartfelt wailing.

At half-past 12 o’clock, His Excellency the Governor of Oahu, escorted by a company of Guards, caused the official Proclamation given below to be read, in Hawaiian and English, at the corners of the principal streets of Honolulu. The proclamation of His Majesty, Kamehameha IV, was received with shouts from the people and evident satisfaction, wherever it was made known.

Minute guns were fired by the U. S. S. St. Mary’s yesterday between 1 and 2 o’clock, and the Trincomalee was firing in like manner when we went to press.

The time for obsequies of His late Majesty has not yet been fixed upon.

[Unfortunately, the Hawaiian-Language Newspaper running at the time, Ka Nupepa Elele is not available digitally or on microfilm at this time.

The dark borders as seen here are found in newspapers when report of someone of import dies.]

(Polynesian, 12/16/1854, p. 2)

DEATH OF THE KING!

The Polynesian, Volume XI, Number 32, Page 2. December 16, 1854.