Early Consolidated Amusement and movies on Sundays, 1915.

ASKED FOR APPROVAL TO SHOW MOVIES.

Being that a law was passed in this past legislative session giving the responsibility to the board of supervisors of each county to make laws to approve showing movies on the Sabbath; the Consolidated Amusement Company put a request before the board of supervisors of the City and County of Honolulu at the meeting of that board on this past Tuesday night, to ask for approval to show movies on Sundays.

But the request by that company was placed in the hands of a committee to consider, and to give its findings at the next meeting of the board; however Supervisor Arnold made his opinion clear that the only means by which those sorts of requests will be approved is by making an announcement of the law for which the board will spend much time holding meetings, before it is clear whether or not a law of that kind will pass or not.

From what is understood, Mayor Lane opposes the approval of movies being shown on Sunday, but some of the board members do not disapprove, but they believe that it is more important to give to the public all things that will make them happy on Sundays.

[Consolidated was entertaining Hawaii before 1917? That classic movie trailer we all are familiar with: Consolidated Amusement.]

(Kuokoa, 5/14/1915, p. 5)

NOI E AE IA MAI E HOIKE I KE KIIONIONI.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LIII, Helu 20, Aoao 5. Mei 14, 1915.

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Now this is one huge hapuupuu (sea bass)! 1917.

GRANDFATHER OF A HAPUUPUU FISH WAS CAUGHT, 750 POUNDS IN WEIGHT.

This Monday, a Japanese went out fishing on his 33 feet boat. When he was outside of Makua, close by Waianae, while he was letting out his line to fish, and as he pulled, it was as if his hook was stuck, and this Japanese didn’t think that he had hooked a huge fish, but he figured it out when the fish began to drag him and his tiny boat. The fish was left to do as it pleased, being that he realized that he would not be able to pull in this huge fish because it was too strong to pull in the water. He followed after the fish for a long period of time, and when the Japanese saw that the fish had grown weak, that was when he pulled it to the side of his boat and returned to Honolulu nei.

When this fish reached the fish market, it was auctioned off and was sold to the Chinese with a $100 cash.

After going to the Chinese, it was immediately cut up into small pieces at 50¢ a pound, and at that price, the money got by the Chinese through retail sale was $265; the gross sale [?] was about $365; and so the Chinese who sold the fish profited about $265.

They say that everything was sold, nothing was left. In the fishing profession, Japanese make a lot of money, when it was work done by Hawaiians in years past; these days, the work has gone to these people. These people are not better prepared at fishing than Hawaiians, but the problem lies in that Hawaiians neglect this money-making profession, and because of this, it moved into the hands of other people.

Look at the great profit this Japanese made in one day, so therefore, O Hawaiians, you must keep up so that you will be prepared in this profession from now on, and that goes for farming as well—that is the only road to living comfortably and independently.

[The current “Hawaii State Record” seems to be recorded as 563 pounds. Take a look at Hawaii Fishing News.]

(Aloha Aina, 1/27/1917, p. 4)

PAA KE KUPUNA O NA IʻA HAPUUPUU, HE 750 PAONA KE KAUMAHA.

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke XXII, Helu 4, Aoao 4. Ianuari 27, 1917.